Woman arrested after shot fired at car in domestic dispute

SUNRIVER – A 27-year-old Bend woman was arrested Wednesday evening, accused of shooting at least once toward a car carrying her ex-boyfriend and two children, then leading police on a chase north toward Bend.

No injuries were reported in the incident north of South Century Drive, and alcohol apparently was a factor, said Deschutes County sheriff’s Cpl. Randy Moore.

Deputies were called around 5:40 p.m. to a home on Elsinore Road south of Sunriver regarding a shooting, Moore said. While en route to the shooting call, 911 dispatchers relayed information that the suspect, Dorinne Melinda Tye, was driving a gold Toyota 4-Runner eastbound on Spring River Road.

Deputies spotted the vehicle on Highway 97, headed north near the Cottonwood Road interchange. With lights and sirens going, deputies initiated a “felony car stop” at Highway 97 and Baker Road and placed Tye into custody without incident, also recovering a small handgun allegedly used in the shooting, Moore said.

Investigators determined that Tye had been involved in a physical dispute with Glen Swain Cooper, 33, at an address near Lazy River Drive and South Century Drive. The two had lived together for 10 years at an address on Tamarack Road, Moore said, but had recently separated. The couple have a 4-year-old daughter, while Tye has a 10-year-old son from a previous relationship – both of whom were present during the alleged altercation.

Cooper then got into his car with the two children and began to leave, when Tye began to follow them, Moore said. Cooper told police the woman was driving recklessly and following too close to his vehicle.

Man with kids in car heard loud pop, saw something zip by window

The man said he had turned onto Browning Drive when he heard a loud pop and something zip by his window. Cooper said he assumed Tye was shooting at him, so he drove to a home on Elsinore Road and shouted for the people inside to call 911. Moore said the suspect apparently heard that police were being called and drove off at a high rate of speed.

Shell casings were retrieved at the alleged shooting scene, where Moore said at least one, possibly two shots were fired. Investigators were still interviewing those involved in the incident late Wednesday night.

Tye was arrested on three counts of reckless endangering, fourth-degree assault (domestic violence), menacing, unlawful possession and use of a weapon, and harassment. Bail was set at $19,000.

Special mass-phone message system leads to missing woman’s rescue

Searches for missing people always have a “needle in a haystack” element that can be triumphant or heartbreaking, in the end. So every possible tool, high-tech or low-tech, can be a lifesaver of immeasurable worth.

And that’s just what happened this week, in La Pine, when a special new mass-phone-call system led to the safe return of an elderly woman with Alzheimer’s disease who took a walk from her home and didn’t return.

Margaret Black, 85, last was seen shortly after 3 p.m. when she left her residence on Cougar Lane in La Pine to take a walk in the neighborhood. Around two hours later, Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies were notified and a search comments.

“They have `night vision’ brought in, they have dogs brought in – they even have a FLIR (forward-looking infrared system) coming in,” said Dave Malkin, former Bend police chief and now the county’s 911 dispatch center director.

About then is when Undersheriff Larry Blanton “has the idea, why don’t we use EPN?” Malkin recalled.

EPN stands for the Emergency Preparedness Network, provided to Deschutes and just two other communities nationwide through a $50,000 grant from Qwest. Using the high-tech emergency notification system, law enforcement agencies can send out a message to all of the homes and businesses in any specified area, at a rate of up to 2,000 calls a minute.

Deschutes County’s Project Impact got the special system installed in March, for a year-long trial. The equipment in the pilot program can be used to notify residents in one area or countywide of emergencies ranging from fire or flood evacuations, chemical spills or other dangers of a more criminal elements.

Call recipient remembers seeing woman while out chopping wood

In this case, Malkin said, “We tape the recording at 911 and it basically says there’s this 85-year-old woman wearing slacks and a light sweater and suffering from Alzheimer’s who walked away from a home in the Cougar Lane area.” The call goes out shortly after 9 p.m. to 1,700 homes over a 54 square mile area – in just 12 minutes.

“It’s just done amazingly fast,” Malkin said Wednesday evening. “It’s all done out of a computerized central office in Boulder, Colo.”

“It’s so sophisticated, you can set it to leave messages on answering machines or not,” he said. “It will call back a number up to four times until it makes contact. It even discerns fax tones,” so as not to waste its time calling a chirping fax machine.

As it happened, one recipient who got the message around 9:30 “recalls that he’s out chopping wood before the sun goes down about 4 p.m. and seeing a lady that matched that description near his house,” Malkin said. “So he gets in his pickup truck, drives around and finds her under a tree,” about six hours after she disappeared. He called 911 and a deputy quickly was dispatched. He woman was cold and wet, but otherwise okay and happily reunited with her worried family.

“It was good thinking on the part of a good undersheriff, and a system” that made it work, Malkin said.

The EPN system “was actually gifted to us by Qwest, as a pilot,” he said. “They took care of about half the expenses for one year. Next year, for us to continue that, it’s $38,000. We’re going to look for that money.”

“The obvious things the system is used for are wildfire, floods, criminal activities, people on crime sprees, those types of things,” the 911 chief said. “But we had never heard of anybody using it for a missing person before. It couldn’t have worked better.”

C.O. Environmental Center announces new mission, leaders

NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Sandra Strieby, 385-6908
Central Oregon Environmental Center
October 31, 2001

Central Oregon Environmental Center announces new mission

New leadership accompanies shift in focus

“Empowering the community to take action on behalf of the environment by serving as a Center for communication, collaboration, and events” is the new mission of the Central Oregon Environmental Center (COEC). An organizational restructuring accompanies the adoption of the new mission statement. Shauna Quistorff and Sandra Strieby have taken the helm as Executive Co-Directors of the Center.

In the words of Aleta Nissen, Vice President of the Environmental Center’s Board of Directors, “COEC helps to foster those organizations in Central Oregon that are working to preserve and protect what Central Oregonians love about living here‹our open space, wildlife habitat, clean air and water, healthy rivers, and environmental education on issues ranging from population growth to recycling.”

Last spring the Center embarked on an intensive organizational assessment and strategic planning process. Success sparked the effort. The Center’s Board of Directors and staff had accomplished much of what they set out to do when the Center was founded in 1988. They are seeking new ways to empower environmental organizations and enable them to be efficient and effective.

Peter Geiser is one of the Center’s founders and now serves on the Board of Directors as the organization’s Treasurer. He explained, “For many years the focus has been on nurturing and incubating new projects and initiatives that are in alignment with our mission of promoting conservation and sustainability. The result has been the development of many successful projects that are now in a position to operate on their own. In a sense we have completed our objectives in this area, especially in areas dealing with urban sustainability.”

Aleta Nissen, Vice President of the Center’s Board, adds “COEC is changing its approach because we want to empower our member groups to do what they do best.” COEC serves 23 member groups, which address a wide range of environmental issues. The Center also sponsors several projects and events. Ann Wheeler, President of the Board, says “The Center’s member groups comprise a rich collection addressing so many issues, and representing so many members of the Central Oregon community. We want the Center to provide a platform for the important work those groups are doing throughout the state.”

Mr. Geiser went on to say, “Our new mission will place greater focus on the original intention of COEC as a Center for communications, collaboration and events. As we transition from the focus around project incubation, nurturing, and oversight, we’ll place more attention on ways to serve member groups and community conservation efforts, including facilitating partnerships, collaborations and cooperative efforts. We’ll also focus on strengthening our own organization and enhancing our facility.”

The Center’s role as a clearinghouse for environmental information will continue to expand. Ms Nissen says, “Providing answers to environmental questions is one of the most important things that the Center does! COEC is the hub of all conservation efforts in Central Oregon and the place to find out what’s going on. We have our fingers in all the pies, offering speakers and slide shows, conservation literature and fliers, a resource center, bulletin and job boards, events calendars, a place to meet that’s open to the whole community and a staff that’s plugged in to the everyday goings-on of the conservation organizations throughout the community. We are excited to be a center for collaboration between community groups and businesses that are striving together to create a healthy community.”

All members of the community are encouraged to visit the Center, located at 16 NW Kansas Avenue. Brochures, newsletters, and other information on environmental topics, provided by the Center’s member groups, are available during the Center’s regular hours, 9 AM-5 PM, Monday through Friday. Center staff can answer questions and provide referrals. And the Environmental Center web site, located at http://www.envirocenter.org , offers a calendar of events and information about each of the member groups.

The return to a management team was conceived in concert with the Center’s transition to its new mission. Mr. Geiser notes that management teams were used successfully as an alternative to executive directorship at the Environmental Center during much of the last decade. “We found it to be very successful in leveraging and making optimal use of staff skills and resources, assuring collaboration and management quality enhancement.”

Shauna Quistorff has served as the Center’s Business Manager for the last year and a half, and prior to that worked as Office Manager. She will oversee finance and operations. Sandra Strieby comes to the Center from the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, where she worked until May as Transit Planner. Her primary focus will be on development and outreach. Kyla Merwin has stepped down from her position as Executive Director.

# # #

Ford Foundation, Meyer Trust to match Hospice House donations

September 20, 2001
TO:
FAX:
FROM: Robyn Holdman, Capital Campaign Coordinator
Hospice of Bend-La Pine
Ph: 383-3910, Fax: 388-4221
RE: Hospice House Capital Campaign

**********************FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***********************

The Ford Family Foundation and Meyer Memorial Trust Encourage Support for Hospice House

The Ford Family Foundation and Meyer Memorial Trust have pledged to support the Hospice House Capital Campaign with grants that will match donations made to the building project by local residents of Central Oregon. Both foundations will encourage and support gift giving during the Community Phase of the Hospice House Capital Campaign, now underway, through early 2002. Hospice of Bend-La Pine needs to raise the final $460,000 to reach its $2.864 million goal to build Hospice House. Hospice House, an inpatient care facility for the terminally ill, will be a first-of-a kind project in Central Oregon. The residence-style facility will be built adjacent to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend, with completion of construction slated for late 2002.

(Update: In the past month, the gap to complete fund-raising has dropped to $372,000, and should be aided further by the fifth annual Madrigal Dinner, a $100/ticket, seven-course feast to benefit Hospice House, with Rennaisance music and entertainment and a “12 Days of Christmas” silent auction), on Nov. 30th at Bend Country Club.)

The Ford Family Foundation has supported the Hospice House project with a challenge grant. Hospice of Bend-La Pine must raise $50,000 through local support to receive $50,000 from the Ford Family. Meyer Memorial Trust has offered to match local donations of $9999 or less, dollar for dollar, up to a total gift of $100,000. Efforts to fulfill The Ford Family Foundation challenge and the Meyer Memorial Trust matching grants will run simultaneously, with each eligible donation applied to the appropriate grant for recording and matching.

The Hospice House Capital Campaign Committee, led by Peggy Carey of St. Charles Cancer Treatment Center, hopes to raise the final 16% of the campaign goal by the end of the year. The public is invited to support the campaign by donating money, equipment, supplies and services, by including HOBL in planned giving efforts, and by designating Hospice House as the beneficiary for fundraisers. Proceeds from Hospice of Bend – La Pine’s Madrigal Dinner and Silent Auction, scheduled for November 30th, will be dedicated to Hospice House.

Currently there is only one other Hospice inpatient care facility for the terminally ill operating in Oregon, in Portland. Central Oregon’s planned six-bed residence-style facility will operate seven days a week, 24 hours per day, permitting family and friends to visit at all hours and to care for loved ones who are no longer able to spend the final days of their lives in their home. Hospice House will also welcome the terminally ill for brief visits when caregivers and family members need a short rest. The terminally ill from throughout Central Oregon and from North Klamath and Lake Counties will have access to Hospice House and its services. An administrative wing within Hospice House will enable the expansion of bereavement and volunteer programs and provide space for education of the medical community and the public on end of life issues and needs.

Hospice of Bend – La Pine, a community based nonprofit organization, has for twenty-one years offered specialized care to enhance the quality of life of the terminally ill and their families. Services are provided to patients and families wherever they reside – in their own home, a foster care home or a long-term care facility. Hospice teams made up of staff and volunteers work together to address physical, emotional, social and spiritual concerns that arise during Hospice care. Bereavement counselors work with families to overcome grief. Unfortunately, 25% of the terminally ill who wish to access Hospice services and to spend their final days at home are unable to do so. Thus, after seven years of research of community trends and needs, and the development of a business plan, the Board of Hospice of Bend-La Pine has launched a capital campaign to build a facility that will offer an option for service not currently available in the area.

If you would like to know more about plans for Hospice House or wish to make a donation, please call Robyn Holdman, Hospice of Bend – La Pine at 383-3910 or contact her by email at hospicehouse@empnet.com.

************************************###***************************************

September 10, 2001
TO:

FAX:
FROM: Robyn Holdman
Capital Campaign Coordinator
Ph: 383-3910, Fax: 388-4221
RE: Hospice House Capital Campaign

**********************FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***********************

Hospice House Capital Campaign Seeks Community Support

Hospice of Bend-La Pine (HOBL) is moving into the Community Phase of its $2.864 million capital campaign to build Hospice House. Hospice House, an inpatient care facility for the terminally ill, will be a first-of-a kind project in Central Oregon. The residence-style facility will be built adjacent to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend, with completion of construction slated for late 2002.

The Hospice House Capital Campaign Committee, led by Peggy Carey, needs to raise the final $500,000 of the $2.864 million budget. Volunteers hope to acquire the final 20% of the campaign goal by the end of the year. The public is invited to support the campaign by donating money, equipment, supplies and services, by including HOBL in planned giving efforts, and by designating Hospice House as the beneficiary for fundraisers. Proceeds from Hospice of Bend – La Pine’s Madrigal Dinner and Silent Auction, scheduled for November 30th, will be dedicated to Hospice House. The Ford Family Foundation has recently offered a challenge grant of $50,000 to encourage local support for the project, with Meyer Memorial Trust last Friday pledging support via a matching grant of $100,000.

Currently there is only one other Hospice inpatient care facility for the terminally ill operating in Oregon, in Portland. Central Oregon’s planned six-bed residence-style facility will operate seven days a week, 24 hours per day, permitting family and friends to visit at all hours and to care for loved ones who are no longer able to spend the last days of their lives in their home. Hospice House will also welcome the terminally ill for brief visits when caregivers and family members need a short rest. The terminally ill from throughout Central Oregon and from North Klamath County will have access to Hospice House and its services. An administrative wing within Hospice House will enable the expansion of bereavement and volunteer programs and provide space for education of the medical community and the public on end of life issues and needs.

Hospice of Bend – La Pine, a community based nonprofit organization, has for twenty-one years offered specialized care to enhance the quality of life of the terminally ill and their families. Services are provided to patients and families wherever they reside – in their own home, a foster care home or a long-term care facility. Hospice teams made up of staff and volunteers work together to address physical, emotional, social and spiritual concerns that arise during Hospice care. Bereavement counselors work with families to overcome grief. Unfortunately, 25% of the terminally ill who wish to access Hospice services and to spend their final days at home are unable to do so. Thus, after seven years of research of community trends and needs, and the development of a business plan, the Board of Hospice of Bend-La Pine has launched a capital campaign to build a facility that will offer an option for service not currently available in the area.

“Building Hospice House does not represent a change in Hospice of Bend-La Pine’s primary mission of serving people in their homes,” said Sharon Strohecker, RN, executive director. “Rather, our Board of Directors has proceeded with the inpatient concept as an expansion of services in response to the needs of people who, for whatever reason, cannot be cared for at home.”

The $2.864 million capital campaign received a “jump-start” with a $1 million anonymous donation. Foundations, local businesses and the public have already begun to support the project through opportunities to name interior and exterior spaces for Hospice House. Naming opportunities begin at $10,000 and continue up to $250,000. Land at the corner of Wyatt Court and Courtney has already been purchased, with plans made to complete the campaign in early 2002 and to begin construction soon after. “It is our intention to operate Hospice House on income received without the need to again make financial requests of our community,” said Strohecker. “This fiscally-conservative approach is how Hospice of Bend- La Pine has operated for more than twenty years.”

If you would like to know more about plans for Hospice House or wish to make a donation, please call Robyn Holdman, Hospice of Bend – La Pine at 383-3910.

Assessor to send out veterans exemption applications

MEDIA NOTICE For Immediate Release –
Contact: Tana West, 388-6509

Bend, Oregon, October 31, 2001-

Assessor’s Office To Send Out Veterans Exemption Applications
_____________________________

The Deschutes County Assessor’s Office will be sending out Veterans exemptions applications during the month of November. Applications must be filed annually with the Assessor on or before April 1 of each year.

Veterans who have received a notice of disability certification from the Department of Veterans Affairs or any branch of the Armed Forces that they are 40% or more disabled may qualify for the partial exemption. A veteran may also qualify if a licensed physician certifies that they are 40% or more disabled and they meet the income qualifications as stated on the back of the application.

Surviving spouses, who remain unmarried, of an honorably discharged war veteran may also qualify for the partial exemption. Surviving spouses of a veteran whom is eligible for exemption can apply at any time during the tax year if the veteran died during the current or prior tax year.

To request an application or further information regarding the Veterans Exemption Program, please contact the Assessor’s office at 388-6508.

Public invited to reception for new City Manager David Hales

For Immediate Release
From: Ellen Waterston
City of Bend Communications Liaison, 385-7025

Re: Meet New City Manager David Hales

For More

Information: Administrative Specialist Darcy Justice, 541/388-5505

Date: October 31, 2001

PUBLIC INVITED TO RECEPTION FOR NEW CITY MANAGER DAVID HALES

The public is invited to attend an open house reception for Bend’s new City Manager David Hales on Monday, November 5, from 4:00 to 7:00 PM at the Welcome Center, 63085 N Hwy 97. The open house will be hosted by City of Bend Mayor Bill Friedman, President and CEO of the Bend Chamber of Commerce Gary Peters and Bend Visitor & Convention Bureau Executive Director Jackie French. They will be greeting attendees and introducing Mr. Hales to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call Administrative Specialist Darcy Justice at 541/388-5505.

Realtors’ bowling tourney benefits Bend Habitat for Humanity

Bend Area Habitat for Humanity
1860 N.E. 4th Street (541)385-5387 Bend, OR 97701
http://www.bendhabitat4humanity.com

PRESS RELEASE

First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon recently sponsored a “Back to the 50’s” Realtors Bowling Tournament to benefit Bend Area Habitat for Humanity. The event netted $1,200 that will be used to build affordable housing for Bend’s families in need.

Twenty-nine teams made up of Realtors, lenders and title company representatives participated in the event held at Lava Lanes. The Strategic Mortgage team took 1st place in the event.

Other awards included: High Score- Jan Zukaitis of Coldwell Banker/Morris in the Men’s Division, and Sarah Mailkowski, Bank of the Cascades in the Women’s Division.

The Best 50’s Costume award went to the team from Steve Scott and Company who won gift certificates to Pilot Butte Drive-in for burgers, fries and shakes.

Local businesses donated items that were raffled throughout the evening.

First American Title’s Annette Zukaitis, Vice President, Marketing Director and Matt Hauer, Account Representative, coordinated the semi-annual event that raises money for local charities.

Submitted by,

Linda Barker,
Community Resource Coordinator
Bend Area Habitat for Humanity
385-5387
lbarker@habitat4humanity.com

Contacts:

Annette Zukaitis or Matt Hauer
First American Title Company of Oregon
382-4201

House near Prineville destroyed by fire; family flees unharmed

PRINEVILLE – A trip outside to the woodpile led to discovery of an attic fire Tuesday night, enabling a family to safely escape a blaze that destroyed a home west of Prineville.

There were three smoke detectors in the house – two in the destroyed attic and one downstairs that had its batteries removed, because it sounded whenever the woodstove was lit, officials said.

Fire crews were dispatched around 8:45 p.m. to the fire in a single-story rental home in the 4200 block of O’Neil Highway, about three miles west of Prineville, said fire department (http://www.prinevillefire.com) Division Chief Jim Dean. It took 15 firefighters more than two hours to control the fire, the cause of which remained under investigation Wednesday. Authorities still were trying to contact the owner of the home, who lived out of the area.

The first crews to arrive found heavy flames shooting from the east-end roof of the house, but firefighters were told that renter Reeta Dubin and her family had fled the home unharmed. Firefighters found that the flames had not yet reached the living area of the house, so the first crew to enter cut a hole in the dining room ceiling to attack the flames above, said Shift Commander Diego Aramburu.

“If it were not for our strong volunteer force, the task would have been much more difficult and prolonged,” Aramburu said.

Family members earlier had smelled smoke they assumed came from the woodstove, Dean said, and the lights had flickered. But Dean said that apparently was not unusual in the home, which was at least 40 years old. It was only on a trip outside to get more wood that they saw flames shooting from the attic, he said.

The fire destroyed the attic and caused extensive damage to the home, which was believed to be a total loss, Aramburu said. Dean pegged an initial damage estimate at $60,000 to the structure alone. There also was heavy smoke damage to the furniture and belongings of Dubin’s family. The Red Cross was notified and was providing shelter, food and clothing to the displaced family, Aramburu said.

Oregon remains nation’s largest Christmas tree producer

OREGON CHRISTMAS TREES HEAD FOR EXPORT MARKETS

Trees now being harvested, inspected, and shipped to international markets

October 31, 2001. . . Oregon, the leading producer of Christmas trees in the United States, is starting the annual ritual of harvesting and shipping some of those trees to export markets ranging from Mexico to Japan. In the next few weeks, the activity will accelerate to include the domestic market as well as foreign customers.

That means inspectors with the Oregon Department of Agriculture will be busy from now until early December, inspecting Christmas trees in order to issue the phytosanitary certificates required to bring trees into other states and countries.

“We have to look at the trees and make sure they are free of the pests and diseases that the foreign countries are most worried about,” says Gordon Wogan, who has been an ODA nursery and Christmas tree inspectors for 25 years.

The inspection service is gladly paid for by the growers.

“ODA’s certification program is, I think, the number one program in the nation,” says Bob Schaefer of Noble Mountain Christmas Trees of Polk County, one of Oregon’s largest operations at 3,600 acres and about six million trees. “The program makes us all accountable and is important. We have a perishable product that needs to be monitored so consumers can reasonably expect they are getting a quality product that is free of pests and disease.”

Believe it or not, some growers have already shipped trees overseas to countries that are gearing up for the holiday shopping season. Holiday Tree Farm, based in Corvallis, is another large grower that exports up to 20% of its trees.

“We have shipped to Japan, Saipan, Guam and a couple of Central American countries– Costa Rica and Guatemala,” says Holiday’s Gene Carson.

Not all of the early shipments leave the U.S.

“We have sent one load to Hollywood,” says Noble Mountain’s Schaefer. “Those trees go to the studios. Apparently some of these Christmas specials on TV aren’t actually filmed at Christmas time.”

Nonetheless, it’s the export market that gets the early attention. In the next few weeks, Oregon Christmas trees will arrive in Asia, the South Pacific, Central America, and the U.S.’s closest neighbors– Canada and Mexico.

According to the Oregon Agricultural Statistics Service, 8.5 million Christmas trees were harvested in the state last year. This year’s harvest is expected to be about 8.3 million. Oregon’s population is not large enough to consume any more than a few hundred-thousand trees. That’s why so many need to leave the state.

“The export market takes surplus trees out of the United States which keeps the price from depressing,” says Schaefer.

Based on ODA statistics, inspectors wrote 1,462 phytosanitary certificates for Christmas trees in 2000. Mexico remains the top export market with an overwhelming 79% of all phytosanitary certificates written by ODA. Puerto Rico and Hong Kong are next at about 2% each. Other export markets receiving smaller amounts of Oregon Christmas trees, in order, include Guam, Canada, Panama, Costa Rica, Singapore, Guatemala, Korea and Taiwan.

Trees to Asia rarely find their way into a home, but are used for commercial purposes such as department stores and office buildings. Containers headed overseas make the refrigerated journey in as many as 25 days. The trees remain fresh and in good shape in time for the pre-holiday shopping season.

Still, most growers prefer to feed the heavy appetite of the U.S. market first. The demand seems to be strong again, as it has been the past three years. The pendulum has swung in favor of the growers in recent times.

“We suffered through a decade of wondering why we are growing Christmas trees, so it is nice to get back to a time when people really do want your trees,” says Carson.

“It’s cyclical like everything else and we know that production numbers are going to significantly increase in a couple of years,” adds Schaefer, who recalls a time in the late 80s and early 90s when overproduction flattened prices. The end result was a lot of growers who went out of business which, in turn, reduced the number of trees on the market and eventually raised the price.

Oregon remains the nation’s leader in Christmas tree production. The industry has a value of $135 million and is one of the state’s top ten commodities. Oregon’s 611 growers are concentrated in the Willamette Valley, but there are licensed growers in many other counties, including some east of the Cascades.

Douglas fir is still the mainstay of Oregon production, although the noble fir continues to be popular with consumers. Oregon soils and climate are conducive to growing a quality Christmas tree.

Christmas tree growers in Oregon should have little trouble selling what they have to offer this year– most of it in the states. But again, having that export market available keeps the industry from having to dump trees onto the domestic market. ODA inspection is essential to those exports.

“I’ve had one grower tell me that if it wasn’t for ODA inspectors, our Christmas tree industry would be worth only half as much as it is today,” says Bryan Ostlund, executive secretary of the Pacific Northwest Christmas Tree Association.

That little piece of paper signed by the ODA inspector enables an important Oregon commodity to leave the state with the assurance of a high quality product that is free of unwanted pests and disease. It’s worth a lot to the industry.

For more information, contact Bruce Pokarney at (503) 986-4559.

Sen. Smith co-sponsors bill to aid small firms suffering since 9/11

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 31, 2001

CONTACT:
Joe Sheffo
202/228-1823
Rebecca Wilder
202/224-0018

SMITH PUSHES BILL TO ASSIST OREGON SMALL BUSINESSES

Bill Will Provide Relief for Businesses Suffering since the September 11 Attacks

WASHINGTON, D.C.- Senator Gordon Smith (R-OR) today announced his cosponsorship
of the American Small Business Emergency Relief and Recovery Act, a bill which
will expand access to Small Business Administration (SBA) loans and management
counseling. The expansion of these services will help affected small businesses
meet their payments on existing debts, finance their businesses, and maintain
and create jobs, thereby increasing economic stability for the entire country.

“Many small businesses have suffered because of the attacks of September 11th,”
Smith said. “Slowdowns in travel and tourism have created a trickle-down effect
that reaches even down to the small ‘mom and pop’ café near the ski slopes of
Oregon. We have the opportunity to help these businesses stay in business, we
need to take it.”

The bill includes changes to two of SBA’s main non-disaster lending programs to
encourage borrowing and lending for new and expanding small businesses that may
otherwise be reluctant to start or expand their businesses in the post-September
11 economy. Businesses who qualify fall into three categories:

I. Small businesses directly affected by the attacks because of physical
proximity to the areas attacked.

II. Small businesses not physically damaged or destroyed, but indirectly
affected because they are a supplier, service provider, or complementary
industry to a directly affected business. These include the financial,
hospitality, travel and tour industries, or are dependent on the business of a
closed or suspended business.

III. Small businesses in need of financing, procurement assistance, or
management counseling in the economic aftermath of September 11.

“Since the attacks, we have all come together in a truly great spirit of support
for our fellow man,” Smith said. “Small businesses are the backbone of our
economy. By helping them in this time of need, we are not only helping our
economy, we are helping our neighbors, friends, and fellow Oregonians.”

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