COCC news: Latino film series, EMS orientation

A Latino Film Series is scheduled for two Thursdays, April 15 and 22. The films will be shown at 7 p.m. in Hitchcock Auditorium on the Central Oregon Community College Bend campus. The films are free, and the public is welcome.

April 15 – “Amores Perros” (Mexico)

In telling three stories connected by one traumatic incident, Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu expresses the notion that we are defined by what we lose-from our loves to our family, our innocence, or even our lives. These interwoven tales are united by a devastating car crash that provides the film’s narrative nexus and by the many dogs that the characters own or care for. Guest presenter: Dr. Frank Cobarrubia, Bend physician, board member of Human Dignity Coalition

April 22 – “La Lengua de Las Mariposas” (Spain)

This gentle, devastating film, based on short stories by the Spanish writer Manuel Rivas, tells the story of Moncho (Manuel Lozano), a sensitive young boy coming of age in the months before the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. Moncho’s relationship with his teacher, the proudly Republican Don Gregorio, beautifully played by Fernando Fernan Gomez, gives the story an unusual degree of pathos and political complexity. (A. O. Scott, “The New York Times”) Guest presenter: Dick Falxa, Bend High School and COCC Spanish instructor

Both films are rated R. The series is sponsored by the Human Dignity Coalition and COCC Diversity Committee. For information, call Steve O’Brien at 383-7279.

Anyone wishing to attend this event who has special needs resulting from a physical disability should contact Gene Zinkgraf, ADA coordinator, at least three days in advance of the event. He can be reached at 383-7775 or through the college’s TTY number, 383-7708.
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COCC OFFERS ORIENTATION FOR EMS PROGRAM

An orientation for Central Oregon Community College’s associate of applied science degree program in emergency medical services is set for 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 14, in Room 159 of the Boyle Education Center on the COCC Bend campus.

Representatives from COCC will discuss admission to the program: the application process, prerequisites for applying and support courses necessary for the EMS degree. Entrance into this program is competitive, and space is limited. It is not necessary to be enrolled at COCC to attend this orientation.

For information, call 383-7214.
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COCC HOSTS HIGH SCHOOL MATH CONTEST

The 26th annual Central Oregon Math Contest will be held Thursday, April 15, on the Central Oregon Community College Bend campus. More than 100 students from area high schools will be competing in one of six levels of math skills through educational and amusing events such as scavenger hunts, math bees and relays. The public is invited to attend.

All participants will receive certificates of participation and T-shirts. Several winners will be invited to participate in the state contest hosted by Oregon State University, and the top quiz winners in Algebra II, Advanced Math and Calculus will receive free tuition for a COCC class. The contest is sponsored by Bend Research, the COCC Math Department and COCC Printing Services.

Registration will begin at 8:45 a.m. in the upper lobby of Pioneer Hall. Awards will be presented at 3:15 p.m. in Room 201 of Pioneer Hall. For information, call 383-7289.

More prescribed burning near Sunriver, Sisters

Sunriver residents and Highway 97 motorists may see smoke east of them Thursday when fire managers plan to burn about 250 acres on the Deschutes National Forest.

The two controlled burns will occur 11 miles east of Sunriver, near Fuzztail and Lava Top Buttes. The objective of the burns is to re-introduce fire into Ponderosa pine stands where it has historically been excluded.

Firefighters with Central Oregon Fire Management Services plan to burn brush and woody material that would feed wildland fires in Ponderosa pine stands. Walker Range Fire Patrol firefighters from Crescent may be involved in the operation.

Fire managers are taking advantage of warm springtime weather to conduct controlled burns through the weekend in areas free of snow.

They plan to use a helicopter Friday to ignite 900 acres on the Deschutes National Forest, 25 miles east of Crescent.

SISTERS- A prescribed burn is being conducted Thursday on the Deschutes National Forest approximately two miles south of Sisters near County Road 16. The burn is approximately 20 acres in size and is expected to be complete by the end of the day. Ignition occurred at 12:40 pm.

Western Junior Olympics held at Mt. Bachelor

Friday’s Downhill race at the Junior Olympics was on Cliffhanger. Under snowy conditions, Don Brockett of the PNSA team led the men with a time of 1:15.72. Errol Kerr (1:16.14), Michael Paap (1:16.89) and Dustin Altmann (1:18.57) earned 2nd-4th, respectively. Laurenne Ross of Bend’s local MBSEF team won the women’s division with a time of 1:22.67, with Alaina Huestis (1:23.52), Courtney Nova (1:23.92) and Keleana Thorsen (1:24.41) placing 2nd-4th, respectively.

Saturday’s snowy SuperG race on Cliffhanger proved to be a success with Greg Bartels (Far West) taking 1st place at 1:17.31, closely followed by Errol Kerr (1:17.73), Brandon Cramer (1:17.82) and Shane Collins (1:17.86). The women’s SuperG proved to be just as competitive with Laurenne Ross of MBSEF again placing 1st at 1:16.26, with Dominique Kun (1:16.47), Dawn Hamilton (1:16.75) and Krista Berman (1:17.63) all in hot pursuit.

The Giant Slalom race took place with sunshine on Thunderbird with the women on Sunday and the men on Monday. This time, it was a tie for 1st place in the men’s division between Jordan Breighner (InterMountain) and Nick Narbutovskih, each with a total time of 2:05.24. Greg Bartels (2:05.99) and Brandon Cramer (2:07.34) took 3rd and 4th. For the women, Laurenne Ross (MBSEF) proved once again that she belongs at the top with a time of 2:22.55. Charlotte Gourlay (2:22.79), Dominique Kun (2:22.83) and Lauren Eder (2:23.19) took 2nd-4th.

Tuesday was the final day of the competition and the Slalom race on Thunderbird. Under clouds and light snow, Brandon Cramer (1:49.92) of PNSA took first, Jordan Breighner (1:50.23), Shane Collins (1:51.08) and Michael Paap (1:52.97) placed 2nd-4th. For the women, it was Lauren Eder (InterMountain) who won this time with 1:58.53. Elysse Kompaniez (1:58.74) placed 2nd, Dominique Kun (1:58.79) took 3rd and Laurenne Ross (1:59.34) grabbed 4th place and title of the 4-way Overall winner for the women.

The CellularOne USSA Western Region J1/JII Junior Olympics is sponsored by CellularOne, Mt. Bachelor, Salomon, The Center, Bend Research and the Mt. Bachelor Ski Education Foundation.

Mandala Agency signs three new clients

Three months through 2004 and The Mandala Agency’s Portland office has already signed on three new clients and completed initial marketing programs for each – Avista Labs of Spokane, Washington; Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland and Adair Homes of Beaverton.

“This has been a great start to the year,” said Mandala Agency President Matthew Bowler. “It’s always nice to announce winning new accounts, but the gestation period between announcing a new client/agency partnership and actually
producing work is so often longer than you would anticipate. Each of these companies came to us with urgent marketing needs and we were able to act quickly.”

Fuel cell manufacturer Avista Labs tasked Mandala and its design division I.VOX with development of a complete new corporate identity including name, logo, graphic look and launch advertising. Mandala responded, renaming the company, whose specialty is hydrogen-powered, back-up power cells for the wireless telecom industry, ReliOnâ„¢ and developing a new
logo and accompanying graphic identity.

For Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland, Mandala called on its Portland office to extend the considerable work it has done for the Central Oregon chapters of the organization. Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland implemented a mix of marketing materials from the Central Oregon chapter’s recent campaigns as well as commissioned new television, newspaper, radio and outdoor advertising targeted specifically to the Portland area.

“In the case of ReliOn and Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland, I credit the presence of our Portland office with opening those doors,” Bowler said. “Our creative development is still all done in Bend, with the lower cost structure this location allows, but the Portland account service presence makes it easier to personally service clients in Portland and other markets more easily accessed from there.”

Mandala’s Portland and Bend offices are also teaming to service the account of Beaverton-based homebuilder Adair Homes. Headquartered in Beaverton with six offices located in Oregon, Washington and Idaho, Adair Homes built more than
600 homes in 2003. The company looked to Mandala to help them communicate the message that they are creating more than just a house for their buyers, they are creating a path to financial freedom. To date, Mandala has created newspaper and direct mail advertising as well as several collateral pieces used in the sales process.

Founded in 1980, The Mandala Agency is a full-service marketing and advertising firm. The Agency provides advertising, marketing and public relations services to clients nationwide including Adair Homes; BendBroadband; Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon and Portland; Central Oregon Community College; EARTH2O bottled water; Edge Wireless – AT&T Wireless Communications; Columbia River Bank; Mountain Hardwear; NO-COAT Drywall Systems International; ReliOn; Roseburg Lumber; Teledyne Continental Motors and The Lancair Company.

Business startup workshops in Bend, Redmond

COCC’s Business Development Center will be giving a two-hour workshop in Redmond from noon to 2:00 pm on Thursday April 15 and also in Bend from noon to 2:00 pm on Wednesday April 28, for people contemplating business ownership. The two-hour session will cover all the basic steps you need to take to open your own business. If you’re thinking of starting your own business, register for one of these workshops entitled “How to Start a Business.” Location in Redmond is the MATC building at the Redmond North Campus. Location in Bend is the Boyle Education Center at the COCC Bend campus. Cost is $15 and includes a handout. Pre-registration is required.

For more information or to register, call 383-7290.

Guard choppers help recover plane crash victims

Two Blackhawk helicopters from the Oregon Army National Guard helped recovery teams on Wednesday retrieve the bodies of three people, including a Bend man, killed in the weekend crash of a small plane on the flanks of Three-Fingered Jack, in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

The helicopters from the Guard’s 1042nd Medical Company Air Ambulance began delivering recovery teams to the crash site around 11:15 a.m., said Linn County Sheriff Dave Burright. The team members included three Linn County deputies, three members of the Corvallis Mountain Rescue Unit, two volunteers from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue unit, and two Guard crew members.

The victims were extricated from the plane’s fuselage, then carried back by the helicopters to a landing zone set up at Hoodoo Ski Area, the sheriff said. They were then transported to Workman-Steckley Funeral Home in Sweet Home, before going on to Howell Edwards Doerksen Funeral Home in Salem.

“The wreckage was confined to a fairly small area on a 25- to 30-degree slope, on the west side of the mountain,” the sheriff said. Photos and other information obtained by the recovery team is being provided to the National Transportation Safety Board, which will investigate the crash to determine what happened and why, a process likely to take several months.

Authorities on Tuesday also identified the three victims of Sunday’s crash, which occurred in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area, as the trio made a sightseeing flight over the area charred by the B&B Complex wildfire.

Brian Scott Ditchen, 28, of Silverton, was the pilot of the four-seater Cessna 182. He and Melissa Ann Davidson, 24, of Salem, had flown from Salem to Central Oregon on Sunday to pick up Trenton Amos Taylor, 27, of Bend, authorities said.

“They were all friends, and attended Salem Academy together,” Linn County sheriff’s Sgt. Kevin Greene said. The academy (www.salemacademy.org) is a private K-12 Christian school in Salem.

The plane is believed to have taken off from the Bend Airport Sunday afternoon on a sightseeing trip over the area of last summer’s massive B&B fire, Burright said. The Civil Air Patrol initiated a search after the pilot failed to show up for work Monday morning. Efforts on the ground Tuesday to retrieve the bodies were stalled due to deep snow, rough terrain and new snowfall.

Taylor had been a substitute teacher and educational assistant with the Bend-La Pine School District since December 2002, spokeswoman Laurie Gould said. He also worked as a river and snowmobile guide, relatives said.

Sisters plan, decade in making, not finished yet

The little Western town of Sisters isn’t so little any more, having doubled in population in the past 14 years, really zooming since it got a sewer system a few years ago. But the city’s long-standing effort to update its 20-year comprehensive plan, and a bid to expand its urban growth boundary, have run up against a legal gunslinger and his colleagues.

Deschutes County commissioners held a hearing Wednesday on the city’s proposal to add eight properties totaling 134 acres to the Sisters UGB, to meet projected residential growth needs over the next 20 years, as state law requires. But land-use lawyer Paul Dewey, representing two groups – the Friends of Deschutes County and the Sisters Forest Planning Committee – is fighting the expansion, and already has appealed the Sisters City Council’s adoption of the new “comp plan” to the state Land Use Board of Appeals.

At the recommendation of county legal counsel Laurie Craghead, commissioners did not close, but continued their hearing on the proposal to a future, undetermined date, in order to follow the city’s course of action on its comprehensive plan. The county’s planning commission had recommended approval of the requested UGB expansion after a joint hearing with its Sisters counterpart in February.

Neil Thompson, Sisters planning director, said he was hired almost a decade ago, in the fall of 1994, to start the comprehensive plan update process, and compared it in some fashion to the 18 years it took Michelangelo to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

“This is a very complex mixture of elements and process,” Thompson said. “Back then, growth was very slow. We didn’t have sewer.” But it began to pick up dramatically after the sewer system was in place, to the point where Portland State University demographers estimated the July 1, 2003 population at 1,430 residents, a jump of 350 in just one year; the 1990 Census pegged the city’s population at 708.

The county and its cities last year completed a coordinated population forecast through the year 2025, which estimated Sisters would grow to a whopping 4,837 residents by that point. Dewey last year challenged not just that figure, but all of the county and city population estimates, claiming they were flawed and unproven. Rather than face another LUBA fight, the county withdrew its approval of those figures (bendbugle.com/?p=12334) and again has been working with city planners on a revised set of forecasts.

In a letter submitted Wednesday to the county, Dewey noted that the forest planning committee had challenged a lower, 4,167 figure for Sisters a year ago as “excessive,” and said the city now is proposing an even higher 2025 population estimate of 4,936 for 2025.

When it comes to population forecasts, Thompson said, “A lot of people would like to make this a science. That works with inanimate objects,” but not with people, when it’s more of an “art.” The Sisters planner called the proposal a “modest UGB expansion,” in three areas “spread throughout the city. We think this is a responsible, and the right thing to do, for the citizens of Sisters and Central Oregon.”

City hasn’t proven need, lawyer says

But Dewey disagreed, and also raised a procedural issue, regarding a discrepancy he found in the numbers used to show the need for the UGB expansion. The lawyer said he agreed with county staff on proceeding with the hearing, but added that he felt the county didn’t need to wait to make its decision on the matter until the comp plan appeal is resolved.

The lawyer took issue with the use of building permit statistics by the city, and said the surge in growth resulted from a backlog of projects that awaited the sewer system’s completion. “There’s really no basis for assuming that that pent-up demand is going to be continuing” for 20-plus years, he said, pointing to some evidence of a slowdown already. Dewey also claimed that many of the permits were for demolition and replacement of existing homes.

Dewey said Sisters used a growth rate double what the state Office of Economic Analysis came up with, in its 20-year population forecast. “It may be appropriate to double it, but they need an explanation” of why, he said. “We haven’t seen that rationale.”

“The city is right, to some extent, in that it (population forecasting) is an art,” the lawyer acknowledged. “But to the extent it can be math, it really should be math.”

The land-use lawyer said they “raised a number of issues regarding need” (or lack thereof) for the city expansion, such as a state requirement to first consider “exception land” (rural residential property) adjoining a city for expansion, rather than land zoned for exclusive forest or farm use. Commissioner Dennis Luke noted that the LCDC is looking at possibly relaxing that priority requirement.

Dewey also said the city is considering a new ordinance to decrease the allowed density, from the current 6-7 lots an acre to perhaps 4-8 lots. “That suggests there really isn’t the need to expand the UGB,” he said.

But offered up another possible reason: “Some of that is a quality of life issue. Some suggest that 4,000-square-foot lots in Bend don’t provide quality of life.”

But Dewey replied, “In this context, (the proposal) suggests they don’t need as much land as they are saying.” And he noted that the state Department of Land Conservation and Development won’t sign off on the UGB expansion, unless it’s proven that the need exceeds the inventory of land.

Process could take `forever,’ planner says

The only other person to testify was Sisters resident Curt Kallberg, who said he, too, had “been on this long ride” involving Sisters’ planning update. When it started, he said, his son wasn’t in school yet; now he’s a high school sophomore.

“It’s (the plan) maybe not perfect,” Kallberg said, noting that some people had passed away over the years of work, others moved away and others dropped out of the process, “disgusted that it’s taken 10 years.”

“Before my son gets out of high school, it sure would be neat to get this sucker through,” Kallberg said with a bit of a smile. “We worked a long time. The ball’s in your guys’ court.”

But with appeals already under way, that’s not entirely true. Asked as he left the hearing how long it might take to get the job done, Thompson said, “If things keep changing, forever.”

Dewey disagreed, saying the Michelangelo comparison doesn’t fit: “The hearing process began only last year. Just because he (Thompson) has been thinking and working on it for a long time doesn’t mean the public comment periods have no importance. We aren’t interested in undue delay, either.”

Transient arrested in Riverside Market holdup

A 34-year-old man has been arrested at a northwest Bend transient camp on several charges in the March 21 robbery at gunpoint of the Riverside Market, as well as the unrelated theft of a guitar from a northwest Bend home, police said Wednesday.

A man wearing a mask entered the market at 285 NW Riverside Blvd. around 7:45 p.m. on Sunday, March 21, carrying a handgun (bendbugle.com/?p=14374). He threatened the cashier and demanded that he turn over all the money in the cash register, said police Lt. Jim Porter.

After getting almost $700 in cash in his hands, the suspect forced the clerk to get down on the floor and fled on foot in a northeasterly direction from the store, leaving a trail of bills that police later recovered, totaling about $80. A search of the area that night failed to turn up the suspect. The store clerk was not injured.

The ensuing investigation involved a canvas of the neighborhood, as well as a detailed review of the evidence and a review of past and present patrons and employees of the market, Porter said.

By Tuesday, police pieced together information identifying transient Chase Swafford as a possible suspect in the robbery and an unrelated theft of a guitar from a home in the 300 block of Northwest Congress Street, Porter said.

Bend police detectives conducted a search for Swafford and found him staying at a transient camp near the intersection of Mount Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue, Porter said.

Swafford was arrested around 5:45 p.m. Tuesday on a second-degree theft charge, regarding the guitar. He also allegedly was found to be in possession of evidence that identified him as the suspect in the market robbery, Porter said. The suspect allegedly sold the guitar at a pawn shop.

Further investigation identified the gun Swafford used in the crime, but Porter said none of the stolen money he got away with has been recovered. The gun had been borrowed without the owner’s permission or acknowledgment, the lieutenant added.

Swafford was held Wednesday at the Deschutes County Jail in Bend on $180,000 bail, facing 11 charges: first-degree theft, first-degree robbery, second-degree theft, second-degree criminal mischief, second-degree kidnapping, and two counts each of pointing a firearm at another, unlawful use of a firearm and menacing.

High Desert Museum hosts tribal youth art show

Beginning Saturday, April 17, the High Desert Museum will host the Museum at Warm Springs’ annual Tribal Youth Art exhibit. In its 11th year, the exhibit features artwork in various mediums by Warm Springs artists of all ages.

Just some of the unique items included in this year’s exhibit include dip nets, moccasins, wapas bags, drums and baskets. More traditional pieces include paintings, sculptures and wall decorations. Opening day festivities will include special hands-on arts and craft activities for young Museum visitors.

“Celebrating Imagination” will be on exhibit in the High Desert Museum’s Brooks Gallery through Sunday, July 4, and is included with Museum admission.

The High Desert Museum is nationally acclaimed for its indoor and outdoor exhibits and animal habitats, and for making the High Desert come alive through presentations on the region’s people, cultures, science, art, and history. Museum admission rates range from $12.00 General Admission (ages 13-64), $11.00 Seniors (65+), $7.00 children (ages 5-12), and free for Museum members and children 4 and younger. All admission prices are good for two consecutive days.

The Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located just south of Bend at 59800 S. Hwy. 97. For more information or to register contact: 541-382-4754 or visit www.highdesertmuseum.org.

Transient arrested in Riverside Market holdup

A 34-year-old man has been arrested at a northwest Bend transient camp on several charges in the March 21 robbery at gunpoint of the Riverside Market, as well as the unrelated theft of a guitar from a northwest Bend home, police said Wednesday.

A man wearing a mask entered the market at 285 NW Riverside Blvd. around 7:45 p.m. on Sunday, March 21, carrying a handgun (bendbugle.com/?p=14374). He threatened the cashier and demanded that he turn over all the money in the cash register, said police Lt. Jim Porter.

After getting the cash in his hands, the suspect forced the clerk to get down on the floor and fled on foot in a northeasterly direction from the store. A search of the area led to the recovery of several bills taken from the market, Porter said. The store clerk was not injured.

The ensuing investigation involved a canvas of the neighborhood, as well as a detailed review of the evidence and a review of past and present patrons and employees of the market, Porter said.

On Tuesday, police obtained information identifying transient Chase Swafford as a possible suspect in the robbery and an unrelated theft of a guitar from a home in the 300 block of Northwest Congress Street, Porter said.

Bend police detectives conducted a search for Swafford and found him staying at a transient camp near the intersection of Mount Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue, Porter said.

Swafford was arrested around 5:45 p.m. Tuesday on a second-degree theft charge, regarding the guitar. He also allegedly was found to be in possession of evidence that identified him as the suspect in the market robbery, Porter said. Further investigation identified the gun Swafford used in the crime, but Porter said none of the stolen money has been recovered.

Swafford was being held Wednesday at the Deschutes County Jail in Bend on $180,000 bail, facing 11 charges: first-degree theft, first-degree robbery, second-degree theft, second-degree criminal mischief, second-degree kidnapping, and two counts each of pointing a firearm at another, unlawful use of a firearm and menacing.