ODFW Recreation Report for August

Register now for upcoming STEP conference: Spawning Solutions through Creative Ideas
The annual Salmon and Trout Enhancement Program conference will take place in Salem Sept. 11-13 and will feature 40 experts presenting the latest science on salmon, trout, steelhead and related topics. The conference is designed for anglers, teachers, volunteers and others with an interest in fish and natural resources. Visit the ODFW Web site for more information.

Archery deer and elk season opens Aug. 29
The deadline to purchase a tag is this Friday. Expect big game to be in higher elevations at this time of year. Don’t forget to check fire restrictions before heading out.

Opening Sept. 1: Mourning dove, forest grouse, Westside Calif. quail
See here for a how-to for hunting mourning dove and upland birds. According to SW region, mourning dove numbers are currently high—most have not migrated south since no rains have occurred in the last few weeks. Surveys in western Oregon suggest average California quail production and abundance. Forest grouse hunters can expect a season similar to last year.

FISHING

NORTH COAST LAKES

No further trout stocking is scheduled until September. The 2009 stocking schedule is available online.

Angling for warmwater fish, particularly bass, should be good. Cape Meares, Lytle, Cullaby, Sunset, Coffenbury and Vernonia lakes offer fair to good populations of warmwater species. Weed growth will begin to make angling difficult in some areas.

MID COAST LAKES
Trout stocking on Mid Coast Lakes is over for the season. Stocking will not start again until February.

WARM WATER FISH ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES
The mid coast has numerous lakes or reservoirs which offer good angling for naturally produced warm water fish species, such as large mouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill, brown bullhead and crappie. Typically the best fishing is from late spring to mid fall while water temperatures are warm. Tactics such as casting or trolling lures, jigging baits near bottom or using the traditional bait and bobber technique are all productive from either a boat or from shore. Below is a list of lakes near local coastal cities that offer warm water angling opportunities.

Devils Lake (Lincoln City): Offers good trout fishing, particularly at this time of year, and also provides some angling opportunity for largemouth bass, yellow perch and bluegill.

Big Creek Reservoirs 1 & 2 (Newport): Offers fair largemouth bass fishing, slow to fair angling for yellow perch and bluegill and good year-round angling for rainbow and cutthroat trout.

Olalla Reservoir (Toledo): Offers fair largemouth bass fishing, slow to fair angling for yellow perch, bluegill and brown bullhead and good year-round angling for rainbow and cutthroat trout.

Sutton and Mercer Lakes (northern Florence): Fair to good angling for largemouth bass and decent angling for bluegill, and potential for crappie and brown bullhead. Offers year-round rainbow and cutthroat trout fishing.

Woahink Lake (southern Florence): Can be good to very good for yellow perch and offers fair to good angling for largemouth bass and bluegill.

Siltcoos Lake (south of Florence): A large lake with numerous fingers, lots of shoreline structure and a couple large tributaries. Offers fair to good angling for largemouth bass, bluegill, yellow perch and brown bullhead. There is good year-round rainbow and cutthroat trout fishing and a good seasonal fishery for coho salmon.

Tahkenitch Lake (south of Florence): A large lake with numerous fingers, lots of shoreline structure and a couple large tributaries. It offers good angling for largemouth bass and yellow perch, and fair to good angling for bluegill, crappie and brown bullhead. There is good year-round cutthroat trout fishing and a good seasonal fishery for coho salmon.

ALSEA RIVER: cutthroat trout

Sea-run cutthroat trout fishing continues to be good in tidewater and throughout most of the mainstem. Trolling in tidewater with small lures, fly fishing or casting small lures can be very productive. Bait is not allowed above head of tide. Fishing is fair to good for resident cutthroat trout throughout most of the river. Excellent opportunities also exist for harvest of crayfish.

KILCHIS RIVER: cutthroat trout

Sea-run cutthroat are available in tidewater and upstream areas. Try small spinners or flies in areas with some depth and/or hiding cover.

NECANICUM RIVER: cutthroat trout

Angling for sea-run cutthroat trout is fair to good. Low water flows are making fish skittish. Fish early or late in the day, and target deep pools or areas with cover. Hatchery coho may be retained as part of the daily salmon limit. These are stray fish from other areas. A few fish may begin to enter tidewater areas soon.

NEHALEM RIVER AND NORTH FORK NEHALEM RIVER: cutthroat trout, coho

Angling for trout in streams has been fair but will should improve with the small freshet that occurred last week. Anglers should consider trolling spinners or small baits (hint: crayfish tail) with flashers in tidewater for a chance to catch sea-run cutthroat. Fly anglers will do best casting flies toward cut banks in tidewater. Cutthroat anglers should focus on the area from Wheeler up to the head of tidewater on each fork. Angling for hatchery coho is picking up as more fish begin to nose into the bay. Fish are available through tidewater up past the North Fork, but best action is in the lower bay. Anglers should use spinners fished well off the bottom to avoid hooking Chinook. (Note: The entire Nehalem Basin is closed to chinook angling for the remainder of 2009). Bank anglers should consider fishing small sandshrimp 1 or 2 feet off the bottom for surf perch feeding in the lower bay during incoming tides. This can be a great way of introducing kids to fishing. Crabbing Nehalem Bay is reported to be very good. Local marinas on the lower bay and in Wheeler have boats and equipment available for crabbing and fishing.

NESTUCCA RIVER AND THREE RIVERS: chinook, steelhead, cutthroat trout

Summer steelhead angling is slow, with a little improvement during the recent rain event. Hot weather and low flows will make fishing difficult. Fish are spread out up the river. Anglers should approach holes quietly and utilize smaller baits and lighter lines to avoid spooking fish. Be there at first light for best chance at catching one of these wary fish. Angling for cutthroat trout should be fair, with fish available from tidewater on upstream. Try trolling or casting spinners or streamer type flies, especially near banks with wood or other cover.

SILETZ RIVER: summer steelhead, cutthroat trout

Summer steelhead angling has picked up with the recent rains and will likely hold through the coming weekend as cooler weather conditions will persist until next week. However, angling is usually slower in August as river conditions are low, clear and warm. Currently best opportunities are early in the mornings. Good bank access can be found in the gorge area upstream of Moonshine Park (River Mile 54). Anglers are reminded that there are access restrictions in the gorge road upstream from Moonshine Park on weekdays due to heavy logging traffic. The gorge road is open to public vehicles on weekends and walk in angling is allowed during the week.

Fishing is currently good for sea-run cutthroat trout. Good numbers of sea run cutthroat trout are showing up in tide water and spread throughout the main stem river. Trolling small baits in tidewater, fly fishing, or casting small lures from the bank near structure can be effective. Angling pressure for resident cutthroat trout has been low, but this fishery offers excellent opportunity throughout the river.

SIUSLAW RIVER: cutthroat trout

Fishing for cutthroat trout has picked up recently throughout the river and bay. Sea-run cutthroat trout angling in tidewater is good. Trolling in tide water with small lures is effective.

TILLAMOOK BAY: sturgeon, coho

Angling for sturgeon has been slow, but sturgeon are reported to be present in upper tidewater of the Tillamook River. Fishing the upper bay and river tidewaters will help anglers avoid crab and other bait stealers. Hatchery coho are beginning to enter the bay. Best fishing will be on incoming tides in the lower bay for the next couple of weeks. No chinook have been reported in the bay yet.

TRASK RIVER: steelhead, cutthroat trout

Summer steelhead angling is fair, but recent rains have fish being more active which should result in improved catch rates. Fish are spread up river to the County Park. Anglers should approach holes quietly and utilize smaller baits and lighter lines to avoid spooking fish. Be there at first light for best chance at catching one of these wary fish. The river is low and clear. Try using smaller baits and lighter lines. Angling for trout has been fair, with fish available throughout the river.

Construction of a new boat slide at the Cedar Creek launch site is underway. Construction is expected to be complete around the end of August. Contact ODFW in Tillamook at 503-842-2741 for details.

WILSON RIVER: steelhead, cutthroat trout

A few summer steelhead are being caught. Angling improved with recent rains, but likely will taper off with more hot weather. Angling for cutthroat trout has been fair. Fresh sea-runs are entering the system and are available throughout the river. The river is still very low and clear.

YAQUINA RIVER: cutthroat

Angling cutthroat trout in the Yaquina River and Big Elk Creek is fair to good. Anglers are having good success for sea-run cutthroat trout in upper tidewater. Trolling small lures or drifting bait and bobber near the bank in tide water are effective techniques.

NORTH COAST HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER AND ELK (opens Aug. 29), MOURNING DOVE, FOREST GROUSE, CALIF. QUAIL (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

Don’t forget to report your hunt results. Anyone who purchases a big game or turkey tag must report hunt results online or by phone. Reporting is required even if you did not fill your tag or go hunting. More information

COUGAR and BEAR seasons opened this month and go through the end of the year on the north coast. Successful hunters, remember you must check in cougar (hide and skull) and bear skull at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring them in unfrozen. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. See regulations for details.

Both species are most effectively taken by using predator calls, although one can successfully stalk-hunt bear in the early morning and late evening hours, especially in areas with plentiful food supplies, like berries.
NORTHWEST ZONE VIEWING

Invasion of the Pelicans

Lately, large mobs of brown pelicans have been converging in localized areas of both Tillamook and Netarts Bays. Anchovies have entered these estuaries to feed, and the birds are usually not far behind. On occasion, flocks of pelicans have numbered in the thousands and often times in the hundreds, when the conditions are right. It’s quite a sight to see!

Astoria Area

ODFW’s Gnat Creek Hatchery, 18 miles east of Astoria on Hwy. 30, offers beautiful rainforest trails and access to the adjacent Clatsop State Forest. Year-round expect to see great blue heron, kingfisher, American dippers and migrating songbirds.
In spring and summer, look for migrating salmon and steelhead, osprey and the occasional bald eagle.

Jewel Meadows, Coast Range

With the warm days, elk viewing at Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area has been limited to the early morning and late evening hours. As days start to cool down with the coming of fall, elk should be out in the fields longer during daylight. Elk have been visible either along Hwy 202 or Beneke Creek Road regularly. Most of the meadows have been mowed so visitors should be able to easily spot elk when they are out. Several bulls have started to bugle, mainly after dark. Breeding or rutting behavior should start to pick up in the next couple of weeks with the peak in mid September. During the rut, evening viewing should be better with many viewers staying until just after dark to listen for the bull bugles and antler crashing.

Visitors are reminded that areas posted as wildlife refuge are closed to public access and posted portions of the Beneke Tract are closed to entry during any open Saddle Mt. Elk Season including the general archery season which starts August 29 and lasts through September 27.

Newport Area

The trail behind the Mark O. Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport is a good place to observe shorebirds and waterfowl in the Yaquina estuary.

Tillamook Area

Nehalem Bay was the site of a recent visit by several orcas. Infrequent visitors to North Coast estuaries, the whales sometimes linger in the area for a week or two before resuming their migration. They will enter estuaries usually in search of fish or marine mammals to feed upon but sometimes seemingly just out of curiosity. Best viewing areas are jetties near river mouths, which are also good spots for viewing a variety of birds and other wildlife.

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out. The InciWeb site lists Oregon fires and land manager sites (below) may list closures and restrictions.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

FISHING

Weekend opportunities:

* Fishing for fall chinook salmon is heating up in Coos Bay. Chinook are spread throughout Coos Bay from the jetties all the way up to the forks of the Millicoma and South Fork Coos River.
* Bass angling is good on the South Umpqua downstream of Myrtle Creek.

APPLEGATE RESERVOIR: trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Trout fishing has been fair with worms and PowerBait. Trolling off the points with spinners or nightcrawlers has been good in the mornings and evenings. Smallmouth bass are being caught on nightcrawlers near the dam.

APPLEGATE RIVER: steelhead, rainbow trout

Anglers may retain up to two adipose fin-clipped rainbow trout per day, with an 8-inch minimum length. Cutthroat trout must be released unharmed, but provide a fun opportunity for catch and release angling.
Applegate River flows at Wilderville
ARIZONA POND: rainbow trout

Located approximately half way between Gold Beach and Port Orford, Arizona Pond is an excellent place to take kids trout fishing. The best time to fish is in the morning or evening when the fish are actively feeding. Flies, spinners, or a worm under a bobber all work really well. Angling is limited to youth 17 and under.

BEN IRVING RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, bass

Ben Irving Reservoir, west of Winston, has been stocked with 4,000 trout.

CHETCO RIVER: cutthroat trout, chinook

Temporary regulations for fall chinook started Aug. 1. Anglers are reminded to check these regulations before fishing the Chetco River as some parts of the river will be closed to fishing. The river above Highway 101 is closed to all fishing until Nov. 7. Anglers can still fish for cutthroat in the estuary downstream of highway 101.

Chetco River flows near Brookings

COOPER CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Cooper Creek has been stocked with about 9,050 trout to date. About 50 of these were trophy trout.

COOS COUNTY LAKES: warmwater fish

Fishing for largemouth bass, yellow perch and bluegills in some of the area lakes is decent. To catch bluegills use a piece of worm on a small hook or small jig under a bobber. Use a small hook or small jig tipped with a worm and fish on the bottom to catch yellow perch. For catching largemouth bass concentrate your fishing time during low light periods of the day and use jigs, plastic worms, crankbaits, or spinners. Fishing near structure or weedlines to catch largemouth bass and bluegills.

COOS RIVER BASIN: trout, chinook salmon, rockfish, Dungeness crab, clams

Trout fishing is open in Coos Bay and the rivers. Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures in streams above tidewater until Aug. 31.

Fishing for fall chinook salmon is heating up in Coos Bay. There have been quite a few boats out this past week with some days have producing lots of adult and jack fall Chinook. Chinook are spread throughout Coos Bay from the jetties all the way up to the forks of the Millicoma and South Fork Coos River. The best fishing has been around the Highway 101 Bridge and the Marshfield Channel in the mornings before the North wind gets too strong. The 2009 Temporary regulations for fall chinook are now in affect until Dec. 31.

Fishing for rockfish, surfperch, and greenling in the lower Coos Bay estuary has been good. To catch rockfish and surf perch fish near pilings or submerged rock piles and for greenling concentrate your fishing effort near kelp beds for the best success. The best baits to use are sand shrimp or a jig and twister tail.

Harvest of bay clams will be slow in Coos Bay this week because of the lack of good negative tides. The best harvest areas are Empire/Charleston along Cape Arago Highway, and within Charleston, north and south of the Charleston Bridge. Butter, gaper, and cockle clams are abundant in these areas. Before any shellfish harvest trip, make sure to check the Oregon Department of Agriculture website for any recent shellfish closures at: http://oregon.gov/ODA/FSD/shellfish_status.shtml.

Recreational crab harvest inside the bay is good for those with boats and those on the docks. Red rock crabs are the main harvest at the Charleston and Empire docks but there are also a few legal Dungeness crabs being harvested as well. The best time to crab is a few hours before high tide and the preferred baits to use are fish, chicken, or turkey legs.

COQUILLE RIVER BASIN: trout, fall chinook salmon

Trout fishing is open in the Coquille estuary and rivers. Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures in streams above tidewater until Aug. 31.

Fall chinook fishing has been good the past week around Rocky Point Boat Ramp on the lower Coquille. The 2009 temporary regulations for fall chinook are now in affect until Dec. 31.

DIAMOND LAKE: rainbow trout

Last year’s fingerlings are now about 12 inches long, while other fish stocked last year are 16 to 22 inches long. The largest fish checked this year was six to seven pounds. We anticipate nearly 140,000 catchable sized trout in the lake this year from the 200,000 fingerlings released in 2008 plus another 25,000 catchable fish leftover from last year’s stocking. Fishing is improving with the cooler temperatures. There is still a lot of natural food for the trout, but they have been biting on rainbow and chartruse PowerBait and darker trolling patterns. Highway 138 is currently open. For more fishing information, Call Diamond Lake Resort (800) 733-7593 or check their fishing report online.

ELK/SIXES RIVER: cutthroat trout, chinook

Temporary regulations for fall chinook start Aug. 1. Anglers are reminded to check these regulations before fishing the Elk or Sixes River.

EMIGRANT RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie

Bass and perch fishing have been good in the flooded willows on the south side of the lake. Bass are being caught on jigs, worms, and crankbaits. Trout fishing has slowed with the warmer weather.

Anglers should be aware that a health advisory has been issued recommending limits on consumption of all fish from Emigrant except rainbow trout. Information on the Emigrant Reservoir advisory, along with general information on mercury and fish can be found on the DHS Web site.

EXPO POND: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill

Trout fishing has been fair, with worms, PowerBait and spinners all catching fish. Fishing for bass, bluegill and crappie has been good.
FISH LAKE: rainbow trout
Fishing for rainbow and brook trout has been good, with a number of larger fish being landed. With the water getting warmer, look for trout in the areas around the springs. On June 25, 10,000 juvenile steelhead, approximately 8 inches in length, were stocked. Anglers report fair to good catches of these fish. Also try the North Fork of Little Butte Creek for brook trout just below the outflow of Fish Lake.
FLORAS LAKE: rainbow trout, cutthroat trout

The lake is located a few miles south of Langlois. Bank access is limited, but there is a boat ramp at Boice Cope County Park. Fly fishing or slow trolling wedding ring spinners can work really well. Anglers should keep an eye on the weather as it can be very windy.

GALESVILLE RESERVIOR: rainbow trout, bass

Galesville Reservoir is open to angling year-round. The reservoir was stocked in 2008 with about 55,000 adipose-clipped hatchery coho. In Galesville Reservoir, all landlocked salmon are considered trout. Thus, there is a five per day trout limit, with only one trout over 20 inches in length allowed for harvest. About 8,000 trout have been stocked in 2009. Some fingerlings were stocked recently, so be sure to release trout under 8 inches long. Angling from the bank and from a boat has been slow to fair for 11 to 13-inch coho. Anglers are reminded all bass between 12 and 15 inches must be released, and only one bass over 15 inches may be taken per day. Galesville now has a campground.

GARRISON LAKE: rainbow trout, cutthroat trout, bass

The best way to fish is by boat, but there is some bank access at the State Park or ODFW’s access site on 12th street. Weed growth is making bank fishing tough. Fly fishing or slow trolling wedding ring spinners are regular producers for trout. Anglers should keep an eye on the weather, as the lake can be very windy.

HEMLOCK LAKE & LAKE OF THE WOODS: trout

These two Umpqua basin lakes which occur up Little River out of Glide, have both been stocked this year. Hemlock received about 6,000 legal sized trout, plus some fingerlings. Lake of the Woods received about 1,000 legal sized trout plus some fingerlings. Harvest of legal trout has been slow.

HERBERT’S POND: rainbow trout, warmwater fish

Herbert’s Pond is a small pond just east of Canyonville on Tiller Highway. The pond has a good warm water fishery for kids including bluegill, crappie, and bass. The pond has very good bank access. The pond was stocked with a total of 500 trout this year. Angling is slow.
HOWARD PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: trout, bass
Fishing has been slow for all species though anglers report some success with bass, crappie and bullheads. However, with cooler temperatures expected this week, fishing should improve. Trout anglers should fish deeper water; PowerBait, night crawlers, and spinners may prove to be good bets. Anglers fishing mornings are likely to have the best success for trout.

HUNTER CREEK: cutthroat trout

Low, clear water has slowed cutthroat trout fishing. Anglers will want to be on the water early morning or late evening for best results. All zone regulations apply and anglers are reminded that Hunter Creek is open only upstream of the confluence with the North Fork Hunter Creek. Fly-fishing or tossing small spinners should produce well for cutthroat up to 12 inches.

HYATT RESERVOIR: trout, bass

Fishing has slowed for rainbow trout, though some good-sized fish are being landed. Trout are biting on PowerBait and worms. Anglers should try trolling near the weed beds in the mornings or evenings. Hyatt Lake has an abundance of largemouth bass, and fishing for them has been excellent. They are being caught on red PowerBait and lures near the BLM campground and the Orchard. Although small, they offer the opportunity to catch a lot of fish. This makes Hyatt Lake a good destination for beginning anglers.
ILLINOIS RIVER: trout
Resident trout are available for catch-and-release angling.

Illinois River flows at Kerby

LAIRD LAKE: rainbow trout

Located about 30 miles up Elk River, Laird Lake is an excellent place to catch a few trout and recent reports indicate good numbers of trout are still lurking around this small wood-filled lake. Bank access is pretty good. Elk River Hatchery is located on the road to Laird and is good place to stop and take a quick tour.

LAKE MARIE: rainbow trout

Lake Marie is at Umpqua Lighthouse State Park near Winchester. About 4,000 trout have been stocked this year. Fishing with PowerBait has been successful recently.

LAKE SELMAC: trout, largemouth bass, bluegill, and crappie
Trout fishing has been fair on worms and PowerBait. Casting and retrieving or trolling lures or flies has also been effective. Fishing for largemouth bass and panfish has been good. Bluegill and crappie can be caught by suspending a worm or jig under a bobber.
LEMOLO RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brown trout
Fishing is moderate to slow for brown trout. The lake was stocked with 5,000 legal-sized trout and anglers have been catching rainbows from 10-12 inches. The Forest Service has lifted the water warning at Lemolo. Lemolo will be stocked with 1,500 trophy trout in time for Labor Day weekend, plus an additional stocking of over 20,000 legal sized rainbow trout after Labor Day. Additionally as the water temperatures cool, the brown trout fishery improves. Lemolo should offer excellent an excellent opportunity for rainbow and brown trout fishing this fall.
LOBSTER CREEK: cutthroat trout, half-pounder steelhead

ODFW surveyed lower Lobster Creek last week and numerous cutthroat up to 14 inches were observed feeding at the head of pools. Only a few half pounders were in the lower part of the river. Anglers are reminded to check the regulations before heading out. Special regulations apply to Lobster Creek, with only adipose clipped trout greater than 8 inches and under 16 inches legal to keep. Fly-fishing or tossing small spinners should produce well for trout.

LOON LAKE: rainbow trout, bass

Loon Lake was stocked with 8,000 trout so far in 2009. The lake was also stocked with some fingerlings so anglers should remember to release trout less than 8 inches long.
LOST CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Trout fishing has been fair. Boat anglers should try trolling deep water with wedding ring lures, worms, or spinners, while bank anglers should do well using PowerBait. Recent catches of good sized largemouth bass have been reported by anglers fishing shallow to moderate depth water. Smallmouth fishing has also improved and anglers report catches of numerous small and medium-sized fish.
The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, working with several local bass angling clubs, recently transferred over 2,500 largemouth bass into Lost Creek Reservoir to enhance the lake’s bass fishery. While it is legal to harvest these fish as part of the regular bass bag limit, anglers are encouraged to release the largemouth bass and to keep the abundant smallmouth bass if they wish to harvest bass.

The public health advisory issued for Lost Creek Reservoir due to high levels of toxic algae has been lifted.

MEDCO POND: rainbow trout, bass, panfish

Trout fishing has been fair. Fishing for largemouth bass and bluegill has been good. Fishing a worm just off the bottom, casting lures, and trolling have all been productive technique.

PACIFIC OCEAN AND BEACHES: bottomfish, coho salmon, Dungeness crab

When the ocean has been “calm” fishing for rockfish, greenling and lingcod has been good. Fishing from shore for rockfish and greenling has been decent. Concentrate your fishing near rocky outcroppings and drop-offs.

Fishing for adipose fin clipped coho has been good. Anglers will have to sort through wild coho to catch their adipose fin-clipped coho. The daily limit is three coho salmon with a healed adipose fin clip.

Crab harvest for Dungeness crabs in the ocean has been excellent.

PLAT I RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, warmwater game fish

Bass fishing at Plat I is now open to harvest. The limit is 5 per day with only 3 over 15 inches per day. Plat I has been stocked with 4,500 trout to date.

REINHART POND: rainbow trout, warm water fish

Trout fishing has been fair. Anglers should try fishing with nightcrawlers or casting small spinners or spoons. Fishing for largemouth bass and bluegill has been good.

ROGUE RIVER, LOWER: chinook, summer steelhead, half-pounders, coho

The Rogue estuary is full of chinook and a handful of coho. Catching these chinook has been a little tougher with the warmer water in the bay, but anglers are consistently catching chinook around the top of tide and as the tide is going out. Anglers are reminded that temporary regulations are in effect.

Summer steelhead and half pounders are scattered throughout the Lower Rogue. Early on some of the best fishing will be around the Agness area. With warmer water temperatures anglers will want to be on the water at first light or last. Fly fishing or tossing small spinners work equally well.

On an annual basis ODFW seines the Rogue River at Huntley Park (approximately 8 miles upstream of highway 101) from July 15 to October 31 to monitor salmon and steelhead migrating upstream. Anglers wanting to fish the Rogue will find this information valuable in planning when to fish. ODFW will post this information every two weeks starting July 31. Click here to see the most current counts.

Emergency regulations (pdf) are in effect for the Rogue River.

Rogue River flows
ROGUE RIVER, MIDDLE: chinook salmon, steelhead
Chinook fishing has been slowly improving and pressure is increasing somewhat. Steelhead fishing remains fair. Fishing is best in mornings and evenings with fish being caught on worms, spinners, and flies. The flow at Grants Pass on Aug. 24 was 1780 cubic feet per second and the water temperature was 60oF.
Emergency regulations (pdf) are in effect for the Rogue River. Beginning Aug. 1, the Rogue River between Hog Creek and Gold Ray is open to harvest of adult non adipose fin-clipped chinook salmon. The bag limit is two adult salmon or steelhead per day, 20 per year, of which only 10 may be non adipose fin-clipped chinook.
ROGUE RIVER, UPPER: chinook salmon, steelhead
Summer steelhead have begun to show up in the Upper Rogue. Pressure has been light but anglers have been catching steelhead on yarn or worms with corkies; spinners are also working. Fishing has been best in mornings and evenings. The river upstream of Dodge Bridge is closed to chinook angling. Between Gold Ray and Dodge Bridge, chinook fishing has been slow.

A final tally of 13,563 spring chinook were counted at Gold Ray Dam this year. As of August17, 328 fall chinook and 3583 summer steelhead have been counted at Gold Ray Dam. On Aug. 24, the flow out of William Jess (Lost Creek) Dam was 1850 cfs and the water temperature was 55 degrees F. The flow at Gold Ray Dam was 1970 cfs. Trout fishing has been good. Anglers should try using flies or small lures. Only adipose fin-clipped trout may be retained.

Emergency regulations (pdf) are in effect for chinook angling on the Rogue River from Gold Ray Dam to Dodge Bridge. Through Aug. 31, anglers can retain hatchery chinook and wild jacks but are required to release all non fin-clipped adult chinook in this reach of the Rogue.
ROGUE RIVER, ABOVE LOST CREEK RESERVOIR: trout
The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will stock legal-sized rainbow trout again this week at several locations in the Rogue River and some of its tributaries along Hwy 62 above Prospect. In addition to the stocked rainbow, brook trout and a few brown trout are available to anglers as well. Fishing has been good with worms, eggs, and wooly bugger flies.
SODA SPRINGS RESERVOIR: brown and rainbow trout
Soda Springs Reservoir and the tributaries upstream of Soda Springs are open to trout angling. There is no limit on brook trout taken in addition to catch limits for other trout. Fishing has been fair for browns.
SMITH RIVER: striped bass, trout, fall chinook, steelhead
Opens for adipose fin-clipped steelhead from mouth to Spencer Creek and North Fork from mouth upstream to Johnson Creek. Trout season also open. Check fishing regulations for bait and trout restrictions. Striped bass season is open year-round, two fish per 24 hours, 24-inch minimum size. The North Fork is open from mouth to Johnson Creek for stripers. On Aug. 1 the North Fork will close to chinook angling as the emergency sport fishing regulations take effect. Chinook harvest will be limited to one non fin-clipped chinook per day, five per season.

SOUTH COAST STREAMS: trout

Trout season in the Umpqua tributaries, Smith River, South Umpqua, North Umpqua tributaries below Soda Springs Reservoir and Cow Creek basins is open. The mainstem Umpqua and mainstem North Umpqua to Soda Springs Dam are open year-round for catch and release trout.

TENMILE LAKES: largemouth bass, yellow perch

Largemouth bass is decent with the best fishing during low light periods of the day. Most of the bass are in deeper water hiding around structure this time of the year. Bass are hitting a variety of lures including jigs, crankbaits, and spinnerbaits.

Yellow perch fishing is good but you will have to sort through lots of smaller yellow perch to bring home enough keepers for dinner. Fish for yellow perch in water 10 feet or deeper and use a piece of worm on a smaller hook near the bottom. The County Boat Ramp fishing dock is a great place to bring a kid fishing for yellow perch.

TOKETEE LAKE: brown trout

Fishing is open in Toketee year-round, and the best fishing occurs early in the morning or late eventing on insect patterns. The lake has both good bank and boat access throughout.

UMPQUA ESTUARY: sturgeon, bass, chinook

Both sturgeon and striped bass fishing have been slow in the lower Umpqua. Crabbing has improved recently. Note change in measuring sturgeon on page 19 of the 2009 Angling Regulations booklet. Emergency sport fishing regulations take effect Aug.1. For the Umpqua, chinook harvest will be limited to one non fin-clipped adult chinook per day, five per season. Coho harvest will be for fin-clipped only. A few coho are beginning to enter the lower Umpqua.

UMPQUA HIGH LAKES AND FOREBAYS: trout

Clearwater Forebay #2 has been stocked with about 3,500 trout this year. Other high lakes such as Maidu, Bull Pup, Connie, Skookum, Calamut, Fuller, Wolf, Cliff, Buckeye, Linda, and Big Twin Lakes were stocked with brook trout in 2008. The lakes were also recently stocked with fingerlings this year. Roads and hiking trails to these lakes are now open.

UMPQUA RIVER MAINSTEM: steelhead, spring chinook, smallmouth bass

Umpqua Basin Note:
Due to high mortality of hatchery steelhead, smolt releases in 2007 were much lower than normal. Consequently, fewer hatchery steelhead will be returning to the Umpqua basin. Angling opportunity and catch rates throughout the basin will still be good due to the strong wild steelhead population, however only hatchery steelhead can be harvested.

Mainstem:
Remember the main stem Umpqua is closed to wild steelhead harvest, but remains open year-round for adipose fin-clipped steelhead. Due to the warm weather the bite has been slow. Anglers will want to fish during the coolest part of the day. Small mouth angling is good from Scottsburg to the forks.

Umpqua River flows near Elkton
UMPQUA RIVER, NORTH: steelhead, chinook
As of mid-July over 12,700 spring chinook and 2,500 summer steelhead have crossed Winchester Dam. Due to production problems in 2007, the hatchery steelhead numbers are lower than normal. Fishing in the Rock Creek area for chinook is closed. Summer steelhead angling is slow. Remember that only adipose fin-clipped steelhead can be harvested on the North Umpqua. The North is open to catch-and-release trout fishing from the mouth upstream to Soda Springs Dam. Call the USFS at 541-498-2531 for the status of parking closures on angling pull offs between Susan Creek and Steamboat.
North Umpqua River water levels at Winchester Dam
UMPQUA RIVER, SOUTH: winter steelhead, smallmouth bass, trout
The South Umpqua is opened to trout and bass angling. In the Umpqua River basin, anglers can harvest 10 smallmouth bass per day of any size. Bass angling is good downstream of Myrtle Creek.
South Umpqua River water levels near Riddle
WILLOW LAKE: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, crappie, yellow perch, bullhead

Fishing for rainbow trout has been fair. Anglers should try using floating bait or worms. Casting or trolling lures or flies can also be effective. Fishing for bass and crappie has been good.

WINCHESTER BAY: sturgeon, coho, chinook

Fishing for sturgeon is slow. Note new sturgeon measuring method in the 2009 Angling Regulations. Crabbing has been improving. A few coho are beginning to enter Winchester Bay and anglers are starting to bank fish from Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point.
MOST RECREATIONAL SHELLFISH IS OPEN
Recreational harvesting of mussels is closed along the entire Oregon coast due to elevated levels of PSP toxins. Only mussels are part of the closure. The entire Oregon coast is open to the recreational harvest of clams and other shellfish. In addition, only the adductor muscle of scallops are safe to eat; consumption of whole scallops from the recreational fishery is not recommended.
Always check for health advisories by calling the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s Shellfish line at 1-800-448-2474 for updates.
Razor clams and current status of particular areas

Crabbing has been good. Crabbers are encouraged to return soft crabs with little meat back to the water. Crabbing from public docks or boat if available is a great opportunity for families to catch a delicious dinner. Kids often enjoy sorting out the smaller crab that can be abundant. Public crabbing docks can be found in Winchester Bay, Bandon, Charleston, and Empire.

Clamming. There will be a lack of negative tides during daylight hours for digging clams this week. There are still a few places to dig clams even with higher low tides.

ALWAYS CHECK FOR HEALTH ADVISORIES by calling the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s Shellfish line at 1-800-448-2474 for updates.
* Razor clams and current status of particular areas
* Bay clams
* ALWAYS CHECK FOR HEALTH ADVISORIES by calling the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s Shellfish line at 1-800-448-2474 for updates.
* Razor clams and current status of particular areas
* Bay clams

SOUTHWEST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER AND ELK (opens Aug. 29), MOURNING DOVE, FOREST GROUSE, CALIF. QUAIL (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

Don’t forget to report your hunt results. Anyone who purchases a big game or turkey tag must report hunt results online or by phone. Reporting is required even if you did not fill your tag or go hunting. More information

DOUGLAS COUNTY
Bow DEER season opens up Aug. 29. Deer populations are similar to last year, with low levels at upper elevations and high population levels on the Umpqua Valley floor. Most low elevation lands are privately owned so hunters are reminded to obtain permission before hunting on those lands. During the early part of the archery season, hunters should find deer on the northerly slopes and near water and green up areas. Check local fire restrictions for current fire danger before going hunting.
Bow ELK season opens up Aug. 29. Elk populations are similar to last year so this hunting year will be average. This prediction is a result of ratio increases, good escapement from last hunting season and another mild winter. During the early part of the archery season, hunters should find elk on the northerly slopes and in dense conifer stands. Elk numbers are highest in the Tioga with lower levels in the Dixon, S. Indigo and Melrose units. Hunters are encouraged to contact private timberland owners regarding access restrictions before hunting.
The statewide general and additional COUGAR season is currently open. Hunters can expect an average year. Cougars are abundant throughout with indicators pointing to stable or increasing numbers. Hunting cougar is a challenge because these animals are very secretive, but harvest success is greatest adjacent to private land with high deer populations using a predator call.

General BEAR season is currently open. Hunters can expect an average year. The dry weather conditions will concentrate bears near streams where foraging will be better. Hunters should concentrate their efforts in the berry patches in early morning and late afternoon. Bear numbers are good with the highest numbers in the coast range, and with smaller populations in the Cascades. Successful bear hunters are reminded there is a mandatory check-in for all harvested bear within 10 days of harvest (see regulations for details).

WESTERN GRAY SQUIRREL season opens Aug. 29. Hunters can expect an average year. Squirrels are widely distributed throughout the county with good numbers in areas of oaks and conifers. Many areas of high squirrel populations are on private lands so hunters are reminded to ask for permission on these lands before hunting.

UPLAND GAMEBIRDS:
Grouse & Quail – Hunters can expect an average hunt year. The season opens Sept. 1. The 2009 summer brood/chick counts point to average production with hunters finding good numbers of game birds out in the field.
Hunting availability and success for forest grouse should be good this year. Blue grouse success is best in mid to high elevations of the Cascades in partly open conifer stands. Ruffed grouse can be found near creeks mostly at mid elevations of both the Cascades and Coast Range. Hunters that kill grouse are asked to drop off in a paper bag the frozen wing and tail of each grouse at the local ODFW office. Please use 1 bird per bag with each frozen bag of grouse parts including the species, sex, age, unit and general area of harvest for proper analysis.

Nesting season production was about average for California quail and average for Mountain quail so hunting opportunity should be good. Success is best in the lower elevation agricultural lands for California quail and mid-elevations of the Cascades and Coast Range near brushy clear cuts on secondary forest roads for Mountain quail. Hunters are also asked if they kill a mountain quail to drop off in a paper bag the frozen wing and tail of each mountain quail at the local ODFW office. Please use 1 bird per bag with each frozen bag of mountain quail parts including the species, sex, age, unit and general area of harvest for proper analysis.

MIGRATORY GAMEBIRDS:
Mourning Doves – Hunters can expect an average year. The season opens Sept. 1. Most mourning doves have not migrated south since no rains have occurred in the last few weeks so their numbers are currently high. Do not forget to ask for permission from local landowners before hunting doves on private land.

COOS COUNTY

General BEAR and COUGAR opened Aug. 1 statewide. Cougar are abundant throughout with indicators pointing to stable or increasing numbers. Bear are also plentiful. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters; please bring cougar or bear in thawed and with mouth propped open for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. Reports indicate bears are quite active. Several hunters have reported seeing and taking bears in clear cuts in late afternoon as bears search for ripening berries.

COYOTE populations are good in Coos County and they will respond to calls. However, calling coyotes on the coast range is challenging due to brush. Since specific license and tag requirements exist for hunting some of these animals new hunters should contact local ODFW offices to learn more about hunting these animals before they start.

JACKSON, JOSEPHINE, CURRY COUNTIES
Fire danger level is set at “extreme” with the industrial fire precaution level set at 3. http://egov.oregon.gov/ODF/FIRE/precautionlevel.shtml

An emergency fire closure is in effect in the ROGUE RIVER-SISKIYOU NATIONAL FOREST, the Golden Stairs Fire has been closed since 8/8/09. More information:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/rogue-siskiyou/;
http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/rogue-siskiyou/news/2009/closures/08-08-2009-golden-stairs.pdf;
http://www.coosfpa.net/

ELK archery season opens Aug. 29. From our spring elk surveys we had good bull ratios. It is important for hunters to pre-scout areas for elk, but due to an increase in hunter activities elk may move to other more secluded areas so scout multiple areas to hunt. Due to the typical hot weather for our area, elk are likely to be found in higher elevation or areas of cooler draws where they can retreat to in the heat of the day. Known water sources or wallow can be good location to start your scouting activities. With the high temperatures it is very important to take quick care of your downed animal and get it cooled off as soon as possible. Fire levels are set at extreme, which imposes tight restrictions on camp fires and vehicle activities. Check local Forest Service and State Forest web sites for updated fire restrictions.

DEER archery season opens Aug. 29. For the last few years deer numbers have increased and it is expected that the deer numbers will be similar to last year. During summer deer surveys buck ratios appear to be high. Most deer will be in high elevations through September. Hunters are reminded that only buck deer having not less than a forked antler can be taken in the units within Jackson, Josephine, and Curry Counties. Check local Forest Service and State Forest web sites for updated fire restrictions.

UPLAND GAME BIRDS season will open Sept. 1. Both mountain quail and forest grouse numbers appear to be average with hunters expecting to have a fair harvest. With the spring showers that caused many to loose there brood most were able to re-nest. Forest grouse can be found in timbered creek draws and mountain quail will be found in brushy clear cuts near water. A good bird dog will aid greatly in bird retrieval.

BEAR opened Aug. 1. Hunters can expect to have an average year. Bear numbers appear to be abundant. Due to the hot dry weather bears will be found around cooler wet drainages. As the berry crops become ripe, hunters should locate these areas to find bears. The best times to look for bears are in the early morning and late evenings. Successful bear hunters are reminded there is a mandatory check-in for all harvested bear within 10 days of harvest (see regulations for details).

COUGAR general season opened Aug. 1. Due to the nature of cougars, hunters find it hard to locate cougars without locating prey animals and the use of predator calls. Locate major ridge lines where cougars travel looking for deer. Hunters are also reminded that they must bring their cougar into an ODFW office within 10 days to be checked and tagged, refer to regulations for details.

COYOTES are abundant in our area. Hunter can find coyotes around meadows where ground squirrels are found. Predator calls are very useful when used in conjunction to known prey base.

WESTERN GRAY SQUIRREL will open Aug. 29 in all of our units, refer to regulations for more detail.

SOUTHWEST ZONE VIEWING
Coos County
The absence of heavy north winds along the coast has resulted in water temperature near shore being higher than normal. This often brings pelagic sea birds—albatross, petrels, storm-petrel and more—closer to shore where viewing them is easier. Several fishing charted boats offer pelagic bird watching trips to capitalize on this situation. If north winds increase in the near future upwelling in the ocean will occur and near shore water temperatures will decrease, so those interested in pelagic bird watching trips should take advantage of the situation now.
Shorebirds are common around local bays at low tide. Many of these migrants are here for a short time in the summer and will migrate to wintering areas early in the fall. This is a great time to view large groups of western sandpipers and other small shorebirds which are sometimes seen in mixed groups.
Many species of “bait fish” like herring and smelt are moving into local bays for spawning and their predators will follow. Presently, there are large numbers of various gull species and American brown pelicans in the bay pursuing these bait fish. Look for concentrations of the birds diving for fish in Coos Bay, just inside the jetties near Charleston and other places.
Buck deer and bull elk are getting to the point where their antler growth is almost complete. Now is a good time to be out looking at these animals because their antlers look especially large since they still have velvet on them. Many of the bulls will start shedding the velvet this month and the bucks will be soon behind.
Douglas County

Bats

Bats can be seen foraging for insects from dusk to well after dark. Look off into the lighted horizon to see their erratic and uneven flight. Some of the common species that can be observed are Big Brown Bat, Brazilian Free-tailed Bat and several species of small bats (Myotis group). Bats are the nighttime equivalent of daytime insect eating birds like swifts, swallows, kingbirds, etc.

Vaux Swifts

Vaux swifts can be observed at Fir Grove Park, downtown Roseburg and other areas at dusk. Look for the awesome aerial displays the last hour of daylight with congregating swifts flying in concentrations forming large vortex’s before dropping into the top of their night roosting site.

Acorn Woodpecker

The acorn woodpecker is a colorful medium-sized black-and-white clown faced woodpecker with a red crown sought after by birders for their lifetime bird list. This highly social woodpecker is commonly seen with young this time of the year in the lower elevations of Douglas County in pine-oak woodlands where oak trees are abundant. Look for this loud and vocal woodpecker in Roseburg at River Forks Park, N. Bank Mgt. area and Whistlers Park. Since this woodpecker is a hoarder look for signs of a granary in the bark of large pine trees that are used to store insects and acorns in cracks and crevices.

Josephine, Jackson Counties

ODFW Denman Wildlife Area, Central Point

Take one of two trails off of Touvelle Road and enjoy bird watching and sightseeing. Below the fourth pond and to the north, you will find the newly-built horse trail that provides great views of the Upper Table Rock and opportunities to see birds that live in oak trees, wedge leaf ceanothus and areas of riparian vegetation along the Little Butte Creek.

Another trail exists on the south side Touvelle. This is set aside as our interruptive trail for hikers. Visitors can come to the ODFW office to get a pamphlet that describes the wildlife and vegetation found along the path, which runs through oak trees and areas of riparian along ponds and along the Rogue River.

Many people are visiting the area for fishing opportunities—bass, blue gills and bull head cat fish are being caught. Carp are seen in the shallows spawning during early mornings at this time of the year.

Ken Denman Wildlife Area: 1495 E. Gregory Road, Central Point, (541) 826-8774.

From I-5: Take exit 33 at Central Point. Travel east on Pine Street to Table Rock Road. Turn left (north) on Table Rock Road to E. Gregory Road. Turn left at the wildlife area headquarters sign.

From Hwy. 62: Turn onto Agate Road. Take the first left (E. Gregory Road). Proceed one mile to the wildlife area. For more information about the wildlife area, visit ODFW’s Web site.

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out. The InciWeb site lists Oregon fires and land manager sites (below) may list closures and restrictions.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

Weekend fishing opportunities:

* With mosquitoes dying down, now can be a great time to fish the high Cascade Lakes.
* Prospects are good for steelhead on the tributaries of the mid and upper Willamette.
* Fishing for bass and other warmwater species is picking up on the Willamette River and other locations throughout the region.
* A few summer steelhead and spring chinook are being caught on the Sandy River

EVENTS

Sept. 11-13 – STEP Conference, Salem

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s annual Salmon Trout Enhancement Program Conference will take place in Salem Sept. 11-13 and will feature 40 experts presenting the latest science on salmon, trout, steelhead and related topics. The conference is designed for anglers, teachers, volunteers and others with an interest in fish and natural resources. For more information and a registration packet, visit the ODFW Web site at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/STEP

STOCKING SCHEDULE

Trout stocking for Willamette Valley lakes, ponds and streams will continue through most of the year. The schedules are posted at our website. Note the scheduled stocking dates for each pond are set for the Monday of that respective week and may not coincide with the actual stocking date that could occur on any given week day.

North Willamette stocking schedule
South Willamette stocking schedule

WARMWATER FISHING OPPORTUNITIES

There are many locations throughout the Willamette Valley where anglers can go to pursue warmwater species such as bass, crappie, bluegill perch, walleye and catfish. The summer months are a good time to consider angling for warmwater fish. Several good spots are listed below.

Benton County

* Adair Pond – 6 acres; Hwy. 99W south of Adair Village at ODFW regional office. Largemouth bass, redear sunfish, bluegill, channel catfish.

* E.E. Wilson Pond – 8 acres on E.E. Wilson Wildlife Management Area east of Hwy. 99 W between Corvallis and Monmouth. Redear sunfish, stocked trout.

Clackamas County

* Wilsonville Pond – 6 acres; on west side of I-5, 1 mile south of the Wilsonville Rest Area. Take Exit 282 from I-5, west on Butteville Road to Boones Ferry Road, south on Boones Ferry Road 0.5 miles. Largemouth bass, bluegill, brown bullhead.

* Bluegill Lake – 7 acres; Cascade Gateway Park in Salem off Hwy. 22. Largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie.

* Goose Lake – 9 acres; 7 miles north of Salem. White crappie, largemouth bass.

Marion County

* Mission Lake – 40 acres; about 5 miles north of Keizer in Willamette Mission State Park. White crappie, bluegill, largemouth bass, black crappie.

* Santiam River – From confluence with Willamette River upstream to Jefferson. Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass.

* St. Louis Ponds – 7 ponds comprising 54 acres; 2 miles west of Gervais on the west side of I-5 freeway. No boats allowed. Special regulations apply. Bluegill, channel catfish, largemouth bass, redear sunfish, green sunfish, white crappie, black crappie.

* Walling Pond – 8 acres; 16th and McGilchrist Streets in Salem. Largemouth bass, stocked rainbow trout.

* Walter Wirth Lake – 20 acres; Cascade Gateway Park in Salem. Largemouth bass, bluegill, brown bullhead, channel catfish.

* Woodburn Pond – 14 acres; east of I-5 from Woodburn north on Boones Ferry Road to Crosby Road, then north on Edwin Road to the pond. Largemouth bass, bluegill, black crappie, white crappie, channel catfish.

Multnomah County

* Benson Lake – 40 acres; Multnomah Falls. White crappie, largemouth bass, brown bullhead.

* Blue Lake – 64 acres; 3 miles northeast of Troutdale off Marine Drive. Largemouth bass, brown bullhead, black crappie, bluegill.

* Bybee Lake – 275 acres; north Portland Road, Portland. White crappie, brown bullhead, largemouth bass, bluegill, black crappie, yellow perch

* Delta Park Ponds – 100 acres; north Portland in west Delta Park. Brown bullhead, bluegill, largemouth bass.

* East Salish Pond – 12 acres; located in Fairview next to Reynolds Middle School. This pond is occasionally stocked with crappie, bass and other warmwater species by members of the Oregon Bass and Panfish Club.

* Multnomah Channel – Adjacent to Hwy. 30 between Portland St. Helens. Access off Hwy. 30 and off the dike road on Sauvie Island. Crappie, yellow perch, walleye, bullhead, bluegill, largemouth bass.

Columbia County

* Clatskanie Slough – north of Clatskanie off Hwy. 30. White crappie, yellow bullhead, yellow perch, bluegill, largemouth bass, black crappie.

* Deer island Slough – 68 acres; northwest of Columbia City off Hwy. 30 at Riechold Chemical (access only at the south end). White crappie, brown bullhead, yellow bullhead, largemouth bass, bluegill, yellow perch.

* Scappoose Bay – 600 acres; south end of St. Helens, off Multnomah Channel. Brown bullhead, white crappie, black crappie yellow perch largemouth bass.

* Vernonia Lake – 45 acres; southeast part of Vernonia off Hwy. 47. Bluegill, yellow perch, largemouth bass. Excellent bank access, improved boat launch

ALTON BAKER CANOE CANAL: rainbow trout

Stocked this week with 750 legal-sized rainbow trout and 125 larger trout. Eugene.

BENSON LAKE: trout

Benson a 40-acre lake located in Benson Lake State Park near the Columbia River. Take the Benson State Park exit just before Multnomah Falls off of I-84 going east.

BREITENBUSH RIVER: trout

Recently stocked with 1,800 legal-sized rainbow trout.

CLACKAMAS RIVER: steelhead, chinook

The river flows continue along in the summertime pattern. Angling for both boat and bank anglers remains slow with light effort on most of the river. Low water is keeping jet sleds off the upper stretches and only a few drift boats have been seen above Carver. Anglers are advised to get out early before the droves of recreational rafters make it onto the water. The warm weather and low water has made angling a challenge.

The latest news for the lower Clackamas is that the coho are beginning to show up. A fair number have been seen rolling near the mouth and bank anglers are finding some success in Gladstone around the Bowling Alley Hole. The Meldrum Bar area can also be a good spot to find the coho as they move upstream and turn into the Clackamas. Boat anglers should try working the mouth.

Summer steelhead angling has been slow on most of the river and the same is true for spring chinook fishing. This late in the season the chinook will be getting pretty dark and the meat quality can be questionable, even for smoking.

Anglers should take note of the deadline below Rivermill Dam and the fish ladder. Angling or even casting above the deadline is in violation of regulations.
The Clackamas Hatchery at McIver Park opened its trap in early June and has processed about 2,000 spring chinook this season, but numbers of fish entering the hatchery have declined in recent weeks.
A new fishery has opened on the lower Clackamas River. Under rules adopted last fall by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission, anglers will be allowed to keep up to two fin-clipped fish per day from the mouth of the river upstream to Rivermill Dam and also from the Hwy. 211 Bridge upstream to North Fork Dam. There is no restriction on length as long as the fish are adipose fin-clipped. The bag limit between Rivermill Dam and the Hwy. 211 Bridge (Estacada Lake) is unchanged at 5 fish per day. The fish may be no less than 8 inches long in this area in order to be retained.
The Clackamas River upstream of the highway 99 bridge will remain open for spring chinook under permanent rules.
Monday readings for the Clackamas showed flows down somewhat at 829 cfs (10.75’) with the water temperature dropping to 61°.

Bank anglers can find access to the river in the Gladstone/Cross Park area, at Carver near the mouth of Clear Creek, along Clackamas River Rd, at Barton Park, at Bonnie Lure Park, at McIver Park.

CLEAR LAKE: trout

Recently stocked with 3,000 legal-sized rainbow trout. Clear Lake is located approximately 3 miles south of the junction of highways 126 and 20.

DETROIT LAKE: trout

Detroit Reservoir is located 50 miles east of Salem, off Hwy. 22, two miles west of Detroit. The town of Detroit is near the upper (east) end of the lake.

ESTACADA LAKE: trout, steelhead, salmon

Will be stocked this week with 2,000 legal-sized rainbow trout. The lake now has a new boat ramp and ADA accessible fishing platform, which opened last week. The new facilities can be accessed from Milo McIver State Park. Estacada is a 150-acre lake on the Clackamas River behind River Mill Dam at Estacada.

FARADAY LAKE: trout

Will be stocked this week with 2,000 legal-sized rainbow trout. Faraday is a 25-acre lake 2 miles SE of Estacada by way of Hwy 224 on the Clackamas River. This is a bank fishing only lake, but good access can be found around most of the shore line.

GOLD LAKE: trout

Fly-fishing only with barbless hooks. Catch-and-release for rainbow trout. There is no limit on size or number of brook trout taken.

HARRIET LAKE: trout

Harriet Lake holds some trophy-size brown trout and brook trout. Trolling with spinners and worms is the most effective method from a boat. Casting spinners from the bank can prove to be successful. This is a 23-acre reservoir on Oak Grove Fork of Clackamas River in the Mt. Hood National Forest.

HARTMAN POND: trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, catfish, bluegill, crappie, perch, trout.

From I-84, take the Benson Lake exit. The pond is adjacent to the Columbia River adjoining Benson State Park.

HENRY HAGG LAKE: trout, warmwater fish

This popular and boat accessible lake is heavily stocked all spring with hatchery rainbow trout. The lake is frequently stocked with rainbow trout, and some holdovers should be available. Surface temperatures have warmed into the 70s, however, making shore fishing for trout more difficult. Warmwater fish like bass, sunfish and perch may be available nearer to shore, particularly in the morning and early evening. Hagg Lake spans 1,110 acres and has miles of bank access as well. It is located 7 miles southwest of Forest Grove off of Hwy. 47.

LEABURG LAKE: trout

Recently stocked with 1,500 legal-sized rainbow trout. Leaburg Lake is the reservoir behind Leaburg Dam on the McKenzie River, approximately 17 miles east of Springfield on Hwy. 126.

MCKENZIE RIVER (above Leaburg Lake): trout

Stocked this week from Forest Glen boat ramp near Blue River to Goodpasture Bridge with 6,875 legal-sized rainbow trout.

NORTH FORK RESERVOIR: trout

Will be stocked this week with 7,700 legal-sized rainbow trout. This is a 350-acre reservoir on the Clackamas River 7 miles south of Estacada off of Hwy. 224.

Boat anglers will find trolling to be a successful method, particularly along the shore opposite the marina and ramp. Worms or other bait behind a flasher can be effective. Bank anglers will find access fishing the shoreline along Hwy 224. There is also a nice ADA accessible fishing platform near the store and marina. Popular methods include cured single salmon eggs, artificial trout baits, or worms.
As the weather warms this is a popular water skiing and jet ski lake. Angling after late morning can be affected by choppy water from heavy boat traffic.

NORTH AND SOUTH SANTIAM: steelhead, chinook

Prospects are fair in the North Santiam between Stayton and Pack Saddle Park. Recycling of summer steelhead from the Foster Dam trap on the south Santiam continues at a steady pace. Anglers can receive recorded updates on Foster trap counts and recycling activities by calling 541-367-3437. This year a new regulation allows anglers to keep non-adipose clipped steelhead during the months of July and August. A new regulation which restricts angling to artificial flies and lures also went into effect this year in the Little North Fork Santiam.

SALMON CREEK: trout

Stocked this week at several locations with a total of 1,000 legal-sized rainbow trout. Follow Hwy. 58 east from Springfield through Oakridge to Willamette Fish Hatchery one mile east of town to Forest Rd. 24.

SANDY RIVER: steelhead, spring chinook

Spring chinook angling has been slow on the Sandy. Effort remains light with an occasional chinook caught between Cedar Creek and the mouth of the Salmon River. The Revenue Bridge area has also been attracting some effort but catch has been slow.

The water has been quite silted up due to the summer glacial melt-off, but the river is fishable. Monday flow readings on the Sandy River showed a continuing decline to 464 cfs (7.91 ft) with the water temperature at 58°.

The hot weather has brought out the recreational users in large numbers so plan your fishing trip very early in the day to beat the crowds and heat.

The Sandy River is expecting a large return of coho this fall, and it’s time for anglers to begin preparing their coho gear. Coho have already begun moving over the Bonneville Dam fish ladder and there are reports of fish in the lower Sandy.

Now open for steelhead from July 1 to August 31 is the mainstem Sandy River and tributaries upstream from ODFW markers at the mouth of the Salmon River, including the Salmon River. Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures; single point hook no larger than #1, multi-point hook no larger than #4.

There is also no limit on the size or number of brook trout taken.
Collection/recycling receptacles for discarded or lost fishing gear can now be found along the Sandy River. Look for them near boat ramps at Lewis and Clark, Dabney, Oxbow, and Dodge parks. Any tangled fishing line or old gear can be collected and disposed of in these canisters as an effort to maintain a healthy, clean Sandy River. Littering has become a big problem on the Sandy below Cedar Creek. In other areas along the Sandy this has been cited as the rationale for restrictions on access. Please use nearby garbage cans for any other types of trash.
SANTIAM RIVER: trout

The North Fork of the river above Detroit Lake was recently stocked with 3,000 legal-sized rainbow trout.

New trout regulations that went into effect this year allow anglers to keep up to two fin-clipped trout per day in the mainstem, North Fork up to Big Cliff Dam, and South Fork up to Foster Dam. There is no restriction on length as long as the fish are adipose fin-clipped.

SALT CREEK: trout

Last stocked for the season in mid-July.

SILVER CREEK RESERVOIR: trout

Silver Creek is a 65-acre reservoir on Silver Creek 2.5 miles south of Silverton on Hwy. 214.

SMALL FRY LAKE: trout

Will be stocked this week with 300 legal-sized rainbow trout. Small Fry Lake is a youth only fishing venue located on the Clackamas River 7 miles south of Estacada off of Hwy. 224. Fishing is restricted to youngsters 12 and under.

SOUTH YAMHILL RIVER: trout

The river is now open from its confluence with the North Yamhill near McMinnville, upstream about 20 miles to Rock Creek near Grand Ronde. The daily bag limit is 5 fin-clipped fish of any size, however no bait may be used, a measure needed to protect wild trout and young steelhead rearing in the river.

ST LOUIS PONDS: rainbow trout, crappie, catfish

Gets stocked heavily through spring with legal-sized trout, and larger trout too. Many of the fish are still available. Prospects for bass, catfish, crappie and bluegill are good. This 54-acre complex of 7 ponds is owned and managed by ODFW. The site is located west of the town of Gervais. Take St. Louis Road west to Tesch Lane, turn left and follow the road to the ponds.

TIMOTHY MEADOWS: trout

Timothy Meadows is a 1,400-acre lake about 80 miles east of Portland past Mt. Hood. From Hwy. 26, turn onto Skyline Rd. (FS42).

TRAIL BRIDGE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Last stocked for the season in mid-July with 2,000 rainbow trout. Only flies and lures may be used and only adipose fin-clipped trout may be harvested. Trail Bridge Reservoir is located about 60 miles east of Springfield on Highway 126.

TRILLIUM LAKE: rainbow trout

Recently stocked with 2,000 legal-sized rainbow trout. Trillium is a 60-acre lake 3 miles east of Government Camp off of Hwy 26.

WEST SALISH POND: trout

As the water warms in this pond, the trout will tend to move into deeper areas away from shore. Traditional artificial trout baits and worms fished below a bobber or on the bottom should prove to be effective. Casting spinners can also produce good results. Located off NE Glisan between 201st and 207th in Fairview, east of Portland, the pond is located just a short distance from Reynolds Middle School. From I-84, take Exit 16 and travel south on Fairview Parkway.

WILLAMETTE RIVER: shad, steelhead, sturgeon, warmwater fish
Spring chinook angling ended on the Willamette River below Willamette Falls on April 30. This includes the Multnomah Channel and the Clackamas River downstream of the Hwy 99 Bridge. Chinook fishing on the Columbia River is now closed.
The Willamette River upstream of Willamette Falls will remain open for spring chinook under permanent rules. The Clackamas River is also open for spring chinook.

The sturgeon retention season ended on July 31, 2009 and is scheduled to reopen on Oct. 1, 2009.

Spring chinook passage counting ended on Aug. 15. The preliminary season total is 25,795 spring chinook adults and 2,719 jacks, while mini-jack counts continue. Summer steelhead passage has been steady with a total of 14,544 to date going past the viewing window through Aug. 20.

Hydro readings at Willamette Falls on Monday showed flows steady at 6,500 cfs, the temperature at 71° and visibility good at 6.6 feet.

Coho are now present in the Willamette as they make their way towards the Clackamas or onward upstream past the falls. The best places to fish by boat would be at the mouth of the Clackamas or along the Meldrum side. Bank anglers should try anywhere from the lower Clackamas to down along Meldrum Bar.

The Willamette provides an excellent warm water fishery in the summer and early fall months. You can expect to find an abundance of bass, crappie, and bluegill available. Target the rocky outcroppings, structures, or old pilings. Casting a variety of plugs or jigs near the shoreline can be successful. A simple bobber and night crawler might prove to be the right choice also. The local tackle shops can set you up with the right gear and direct you to the best spots. Lately, warm water anglers have reported catching primarily smallmouth bass at depths of 30 to 40 feet.

Anglers fishing the Multnomah Channel recently have reported catching some nice walleye. Successful tactics include trolling plugs as well as bottom draggers with worms.

WILLAMETTE ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER and ELK (opens Sept. 1), MOURNING DOVE, FOREST GROUSE, CALIF. QUAIL (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

EVENT

Pheasant hunt, Sept. 25, EE Wilson Wildlife Area, Monmouth. A Becoming an Outdoor-Woman event. Cost is $25 per person. Register using this online PDF form or contact Mark Newell, 503-947-6018: mark.newell@state.or.us. See more workshops

Youth pheasant hunt, Sept. 12-13, Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, Portland. Pre-registration begins Sept 1st at 8:00am by calling 503-621-3488 ext 221. See page 22 and 23 in the 2009-2010 Oregon Game Bird Regulations for more information.

Youth waterfowl hunt, Sept. 26-27, Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, Westside Units. Open to hunters 15 years of age and younger, arrive an hour and a half before shooting time for the lottery chip draw.

Don’t forget to report your hunt results. Anyone who purchases a big game or turkey tag must report hunt results online or by phone. Reporting is required even if you did not fill your tag or go hunting. More information

BE CAREFUL WITH FIRE!

Outdoorsmen are reminded that fire danger is currently very high in many area forests and restrictions on the use of fire now apply. Check with the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon Department of Forestry to find out which fire prevention restrictions are in effect.

Archery deer and elk season opens on Aug. 29 and hunters should be out practicing with their bows, adjusting sight pins and arrow rests, and determining the maximum range they are capable of accurately shooting. Pre-season scouting will be essential for hunters looking for their best chance for early season success. As the hot and dry weather continues both deer and elk will be changing their feeding and bedding locations to take advantage of any remaining green forage near streams, wetlands, lakes or adjacent to cool north facing slopes.

Hunters are reminded that weather conditions early in the archery season can be very hot and dry so planning ahead to properly handle harvested animals is essential to avoid spoiling meat.

General black BEAR hunting season started on Aug. 1. Early in the season bears will be spending the majority of their time in cool and shaded areas trying to avoid the heat. They will be feeding on the abundant berry crops primarily in the early morning hours or late evening hours so hunters looking in clearcuts will need to be up and on stands before daylight. When out scouting, hunters should be looking for bear sign in berry patches close to streams, lakes and adjacent to cool north slopes of timber. At this time, bears are feeding on trailing blackberry, blackcap raspberry, thimbleberry, strawberry, and cascara. The Armenian (or Himalayan) blackberries are just starting to ripen at the lower elevations and the bears should start feeding on those soon.

For hunters wanting to be more mobile and explore new areas away from berry patches, their best success would be using predator calls. Bears tend to respond best when hunters use a constant calling strategy. It can take a long time for a bear to respond to a predator call and hunters are advised to spend up to an hour at each calling location. Hunters are also advised to hunt with a partner when using predator calls. These are large animals that are expecting a meal when they arrive, so use caution.

Hunters should be aware that fire danger is currently high. This may affect access on to private timberlands. Please check access restrictions prior to hunting on private land.

Hunters are reminded that the skull of any bear taken must be presented to an ODFW office or designated collection site within 10 days of the kill to be inspected, tagged and have a pre-molar tooth removed for aging. Only the skull is required for the check-in and it should be unfrozen when presented. ODFW staff recommends that the hide be removed, by the hunter or taxidermist, before check-in and hunters call ahead to make arrangements to have the bear checked. Please review the 2009 Big Game Hunting Regulations before your hunting trip to ensure that you are familiar with all of the requirements.

COUGAR season opened Aug. 1. Hunters will find cougars widely distributed from high alpine meadows in the Cascades to low elevation forests in the Coast Range. To maximize your chances of tagging a cougar hunters are advised to use predator calls that imitate the call of a fawn or elk calf. Cougars can respond slowly and hunters are reminded to stay on stands for up to 45 minutes or more before moving on. It is always best to hunt with a partner when using predator calls. Sit back to back so you can observe any approaching cougar. Hunters headed for the northern end of the Willamette Valley to hunt cougar should concentrate their efforts in the Cascade Mountains. Dry weather conditions will concentrate the cougars prey species where food sources are more abundant and palatable such as around lakes, ponds, streams and wetlands. Hunters should spend time scouting these areas to increase their opportunity for success.

Successful cougar hunters will need to check-in any cougar taken at an ODFW office within 10 days of the kill. Hunters are reminded that biologists located in field offices may be out in the field handling other issues so call ahead to make arrangements to have your cougar checked-in. The hide and skull must be unfrozen and the skull and proof of sex must be attached to the hide. Hunters are required to submit the reproductive tract of any female cougar taken. Please review the 2009 Big Game Hunting Regulations before your hunting trip to ensure that you are familiar with all of the requirements.

EE WILSON WILDLIFE AREA

Hunting is now closed. The photo blind is now available. Call the wildlife area for reservations 541-745-5334. EE Wilson Wildlife Area is located approximately 10 miles north of Corvallis on Hwy. 99W. The address is 29555 Camp Adair Road, Monmouth, OR 97361.

FERN RIDGE WILDLIFE AREA

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area is closed to hunting during the summer months. Hunting will resume with the start of archery deer season in August and the beginning of dove season on Sept. 1.

SAUVIE ISLAND WILDLIFE AREA

Waterfowl hunting on in the Wildlife Area is now closed.

WILLAMETTE ZONE VIEWING

EVENTS

Mt Talbert Nature Park Field Trip, Sat. Aug. 29, 8-11 a.m.
Join the Audubon Society of Portland at Mt. Talbert Nature Park for a look early fall migrants. Meet Ron at 8 a.m. Dress for the weather. Beginners welcome. For more information, http://www.audubonportland.org/trips-classes-camps/adult/fieldtrips/talbert

Cooper Mountain Nature Park, Wed. Sept. 2, 8-10 a.m
Join the Audubon Society of Portland for an exploration of this newly opened nature park in Washington County. The oak woodlands support white-breasted nuthatches and western bluebirds and many other songbirds. Meet Bonnie and Denny at 8 a.m. Bring binoculars, water and dress for weather. Beginners welcome. For more information, http://www.audubonportland.org/trips-classes-camps/adult/fieldtrips/cooper

Sauvie Island Wildlife Area Public Meeting, Sept. 22, 2009, 7-9 p.m.
One more meeting will be held to discuss the proposed Sauvie Island Management Plan, which will govern activities on the wildlife area over the next 10 years. Sauvie Island School, 14445 NW Charlton Road, Portland. The plan can be viewed at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife

Valleywide Wildlife Viewing

Oregon has 15 species of bats most of which occur in the Willamette Valley. Look for bats foraging for insects at dusk. Anywhere close to water is a good place to see bats and they may even fly over your back yard. These little creatures are good to have around as they can eat up to 600 mosquitoes in an hour! The Valley wildlife refuges are all good places to see these fascinating animals.

Beaver, river otter, mink, muskrats and the introduced non-native nutria are common residents along waterways in the Willamette Valley. They can be seen by quietly floating the Willamette River in a canoe or other non-motorized boat and watching the shoreline. They are most visible early in the morning or in the evening when other boat traffic is minimal. Occasionally these animals are seen in the Delta ponds or from the river bike path in Eugene and Springfield or in many of the farm ponds on the valley floor. The non-native nutria has displaced the muskrat from much of the Willamette Valley.

The WESTERN MEADOWLARK was voted Oregon’s state bird by school children in 1927. Meadowlarks are found in grassland-type habitats where they sing from perches such as fence posts, shrubs, trees, or powerlines. Remnant grassland prairie habitats, pastures and even young Christmas tree plantations along the edge of the Willamette Valley are good places to find these birds. Listen for their liquid, melodious song. Western meadowlarks can be seen in fair numbers just north of the east end of Diamond Hill Rd. (Diamond hill road crosses I-5 at the Harrisburg exit). There are untilled pasture lands that still support the native Willamette Valley sunflower and our state bird that has such a beautiful and distinctive call. Although meadowlark populations are abundant in Eastern Oregon, they are declining in the valley because of loss of native prairie to farming and development. s their habitat shrinks nest predators like fox, skunk, raccoon and non-native opossum and house cats have an increasing impact on these grassland birds.

HARLEQUIN DUCKS are Oregon’s only “anadromous” duck. This seaduck winters in the churning rocky intertidal zone at the coast and then moves inland to breed on turbulent mountain streams that mimic the crashing waters of their coastal environment. This bird has adapted to a unique way of life geared to taking advantage of the abundance of food that occurs where water flows fast and frothy. Harlequin ducks can be viewed in the spring and early summer along the middle and upper McKenzie River at Cooks Rapid or Bear Creek Rapid and the Middle Fork Willamette River around the town of Oakridge. They can also be found on the North Santiam River from Mill City upstream to above Marion Forks.

NEWTS, a type of salamander common in the Pacific Northwest, may be observed in their migration from terrestrial environs such as rotten logs and moist soil to their breeding grounds in ponds, small lakes and the edges of streams. These small amphibians may be found if you are hiking in forests during or just after it rains.

EE Wilson Wildlife Area

Waterfowl and shorebirds numbers are building. A waterfowl blind is available to photographers. Call the office at 541-745-5334 to reserve the blind.

From Albany, take Highway 20 toward Corvallis and after 5 miles turn right on Independence Highway. Go 3 miles and turn left on Camp Adair Road, then proceed 2 miles to the wildlife area. Find directions to EE Wilson Wildlife Area.

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area and Reservoir

Fern Ridge Reservoir has extensive wildlife habitat that can be accessed from many access points including Royal Avenue which extends from west Eugene to the reservoir and ends at a gated access point. This is an excellent place to observe wildlife. Berms were built in this area during 2000 and 2001 to retain water along the edge of the reservoir during the winter months when the reservoir is drawn down for flood control. These ponded areas are very attractive to wildlife at this time of year. Also accessible from this access point are natural prairie habitats (to the north and south) that are very rare in the Willamette Valley. In addition to the abundance of waterfowl, many raptors can be seen in this area. Look for short eared owls and peregrine falcons. Also visible from this area are wading birds, such as egrets and herons and various shorebirds.

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area

All units of Fern Ridge Wildlife Area are open to public access for the summer months. There are many access points available and viewing opportunities are excellent for a wide variety of wildlife, particularly birds. Wildlife viewing platforms are available in the Fisher Butte unit located a short walk from parking lots on Royal Avenue and Hwy 126. The viewing platform located north of the Hwy 126 parking lot provides a great overlook of the adjacent wet low prairie. Many varieties of wild flowers are now in bloom and the colors of the landscape are remarkable.

Visitors are reminded that dogs must be kept on leash at all times.

Parking areas are located along Highway 126, Nielson Road, Cantrell Road, Territorial Highway, and Clear Lake Road. Visitors are cautioned that there have been recent vehicle break-ins at area parking lots. Please secure your valuables before leaving your vehicle unattended. Contact the wildlife area headquarters, (541) 935-2591 if you have any questions.

Sauvie Island Wildlife Area

The Sauvie Island Wildlife Area eastside units and Westside, Oak Island and North units are open. All areas require a Sauvie Island Wildlife Area Parking Permit.

Sauvie Island is a main stopping point for migratory birds as they travel along the Pacific Flyway, and ODFW actively manages the Wildlife Area to provide food and cover for them. An abundance of ducks and geese can be seen from many points around the island, as can raptors, including bald eagles, northern harriers, sandhill cranes, red-tailed hawks and American kestrel.

Sauvie Island Wildlife Area is located on Sauvie Island, only 10 miles north of Portland off Highway 30. A parking permit is required for the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area and can be purchased at ODFW License vendors, at the Sauvie Island ODFW office, Monday through Friday during office hours or online. For more information, call (503) 621-3488. Directions to Sauvie Island Wildlife Area

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out. The InciWeb site lists Oregon fires and land manager sites (below) may list closures and restrictions.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

FISHING

BIG LAVA LAKE: rainbow trout

Anglers are having good success. Big Lava is a great place to catch nice rainbow trout ranging from 12 to 20 inches in length.

CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brook trout, largemouth bass

Angler success has been fair.

Please note new angling regulation specifying the daily trout bag may only include one non-fin-clipped rainbow trout per day. Crane is a great place to catch larger rainbow trout, though the novice angler will require patience.

CLEAR LAKE: rainbow trout

Clear Lake is now open and has just been stocked with lots of fish and should be a great opportunity to catch a limit.

CRESCENT LAKE: rainbow trout, brown trout, lake trout and kokanee

No recent reports.

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: redband trout and mountain whitefish

The Crooked River has been flowing consistently around 222 cfs and fishing has been good. Redband populations appear to be healthier than in previous years and anglers are reporting consistent fishing. Good fishing is expected to continue throughout the summer.

All anglers should visit informational kiosks located in the BLM campgrounds in the Wild and Scenic portion of the river where a flier has been posted to assist anglers in collecting valuable information. ODFW and OSU initiated a radio telemetry study on redband trout and whitefish in the fall of 2007. ODFW and OSU deployed new radio-tags in early October in fish caught by dedicated volunteer anglers from the Central Oregon Fly Fishers, Sunriver Anglers, ODFW, and OSU. Anglers are reminded that radio-tagged fish cannot be legally harvested. To determine if a fish is radio-tagged, anglers should check for an eight-inch wire antenna protruding from the rear of both redband and mountain whitefish. A sample of redband trout and mountain whitefish are also tagged with a numbered floy tag protruding from the back. Anglers who later catch a trout or whitefish with a floy tag are encouraged to release the fish after recording the tag number, fish length and location caught. Anglers can send the information to ODFW at (541) 447-5111 ext. 24 or michael.r.harrington@state.or.us.

CULTUS LAKE: lake trout, rainbow trout

No angler reports.

DAVIS LAKE: rainbow trout, largemouth bass

No recent angler reports. Remember Davis is a fly angling lake only.

DESCHUTES RIVER: steelhead, rainbow trout

Mouth to Warm Springs: steelhead, trout

The lower Deschutes River currently has poor visibility due to glacial runoff from White River. Steelhead fishing is poor.

Trout anglers are reporting good fishing on caddis hatches. Look for some morning hatches and big evening hatches.

Lake Billy Chinook to Benham Falls: rainbow trout, brown trout

No recent reports. The flows are now well-suited for fishing. This reach of the Deschutes provides good spring angling opportunity for brown trout and redband trout.

Benham Falls to Wickiup Reservoir: brown trout, rainbow trout

Reports of fair success for brown trout and rainbow trout. No reports from the past weekend.

Wickiup Reservoir to Crane Prairie Reservoir: rainbow trout, brown trout

No reports.

Crane Prairie Reservoir to Little Lava Lake: rainbow trout, brook trout

Angler success has been fair.

EAST LAKE: brown trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, Atlantic salmon

Reports of fair success for rainbow trout and brown trout.

ELK LAKE: kokanee, brook trout

No recent reports.

FALL RIVER: rainbow trout

Recent reports from a couple of experienced angler types indicate that the angling has been slow fair with a few nice fish being caught. Despite the warmer temperatures and increased insect hatches it appears that nymphing is still the most productive method for catching fish. River water temperatures are generally in the 38 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit range. This is a popular spring fishery for fly-fishers.

FROG LAKE:

No recent reports.

HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brown trout

All fishing has been consistent. Anglers have reported catching large bass and trout at the inlet of the lake recently.

HOOD RIVER: summer steelhead, winter steelhead

Glacial flow from Mt. Hood has made visibility low.

Find out how many fish are being captured at the Powerdale Dam trap.

HORSESHOE LAKE: rainbow trout

Horseshoe has been recently stocked and should offer good opportunity for legal and trophy-sized trout.

HOSMER LAKE: Atlantic salmon, brook trout

No angler reports.

KINGSLEY RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

No recent reports.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: bull trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, smallmouth bass

Kokanee fishing is beginning to pick up. Kokanee bag limit is five fish per day, included in the trout daily bag limit. Anglers should consult 2009 Sport Fishing Regulations for new angling regulations on Lake Billy Chinook.

LAURANCE LAKE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Laurance Lake has been recently stocked and should offer good opportunity for legal and trophy-sized trout.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: rainbow trout, brook trout

Little Lava Lake anglers indicated the bite has been fair.

METOLIUS RIVER: redband trout, bull trout

Some recent reports of good success. The warmer temperatures continue to make for good hatches.

NORTH TWIN: rainbow trout

Fishing is reported to be fair. Good beaches, good wind protection and good numbers of stocked rainbow trout are North Twin positives.

OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: rainbow trout

Bait fishing is now allowed. Five trout per day, 8-inch minimum length.

OCHOCO RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Anglers continue to report occasional catches of large fish.
ODELL LAKE: kokanee, rainbow trout, lake trout
The fishing at Odell has been fair. Please note that all bull trout must be released unharmed.
OLLALIE LAKE: rainbow trout

The lake has been stocked and should offer a great opportunity to catch lots of trout.

PAULINA LAKE: Brown trout, kokanee, rainbow trout

Anglers are reporting good success for brown trout and kokanee. Rainbow trout fishing is fair.

PINE HOLLOW RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

No recent reports.

PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, black crappie, bass

Fishing for warmwater species has improved in the recent weeks. Anglers should note an error in the 2009 fishing regulations for Prineville Reservoir (p. 63). The CORRECT regulation is: largemouth and smallmouth bass, 15 in. MAXIMUM length, only one of which may be a largemouth.

PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: largemouth bass

More largemouth bass were stocked in the Prineville Youth Pond on Aug. 6, and fishing is good. The Prineville Youth Fishing Pond is open to children 14 and younger with a bag limit of five fish.

ROCK CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Rock Creek Reservoir has extremely low water due to irrigation withdrawls.

SOUTH TWIN: rainbow trout

No recent reports. South Twin provides plenty of opportunity for rainbow trout, great wind protected shoreline and good beach-like shoreline for the kids to run around on when they’re tired of catching fish. A great family lake.

SUTTLE LAKE: brown trout, kokanee

No angler reports, though the lake should provide good opportunity for anglers interested in chasing kokanee or brown trout.

TAYLOR LAKE: rainbow trout

Taylor Lake is a great spot to catch carp with flies; look for carp in the shallows as water temperatures warm to summer temperatures.

WALTON LAKE: rainbow trout

Fishing is good.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brown trout, kokanee, largemouth bass

Anglers are having fair success catching brown trout and limited numbers of kokanee. The kokanee are in great condition with a few fish ranging up to 16 inches in length. Anglers are encouraged to work the shallows for browns and rainbow during the early morning hours and hours just before dusk.

CENTRAL ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER and ELK (opens Aug. 29), MOURNING DOVE and FOREST GROUSE (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

Don’t forget to report your hunt results. Anyone who purchases a big game or turkey tag must report hunt results online or by phone. Reporting is required even if you did not fill your tag or go hunting. More information

PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT

Temperatures remain warm and thunderstorms can blow up quickly so outdoor enthusiasts should prepare accordingly. Fire danger is a concern and recreational users should check with Ochoco and Prineville BLM offices for the latest restrictions that could affect access and camping.

COUGAR and BEAR seasons are open, and successful hunters are reminded both species require checking in at ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring the necessary parts in unfrozen. Please consult the synopsis for required parts, call ahead of time to insure a biologist is present, and to make an appointment for the check in. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. See regulations for details.

BEAR are more plentiful in the more forested Ochoco and Grizzly units. The denser forested north slopes at higher elevations in both units would be areas to scout and look for bear sign. COUGAR are also present in these 2 units and the Maury as well. Cougars are present at all elevations, and use the more open juniper-sage desert habitats, as well as the forested country. Areas with known cougar activity include the Maury Mountains and S. Fk. Crooked River (Maury unit); S. F. John Day River, N F. Crooked River, and Lookout Mtn. (Ochoco unit); Upper Mill Crk., Green Mtn., and Grizzly Mtn (Grizzly unit).

COYOTES are usually closely associated with deer and pronghorn. Hunters would do well to look for signs of deer and antelope and focus their effort in those locations.

THE DALLES WILDLIFE DISTRICT

Recent extreme temperatures in the region has made fire danger extreme throughout the area. Be sure to check with local state forestry and US Forest offices for fire season regulations before planning your outdoor adventure.

COUGAR and BEAR seasons opened Aug. 1. Successful hunters, remember you must check in cougar (hide and skull) and bear skull at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring them in unfrozen. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. See regulations for details.

BEAR hunters should focus their efforts within higher elevation berry fields or recent clearcuts within the Hood unit, or in one of the stream canyons along the eastern edge of the Cascades in the White River unit. With temperatures in the 90’s even at high elevations, animal activity will generally be limited to times close to dawn or dusk. Finding a good vantage point and spending time with good optics can increase the odds of finding a bear.

Those wishing to pursue COYOTE will find the best success near agricultural lands. Be sure to ask permission to hunt private lands. Limited opportunities may also be found at White River Wildlife area, and on lower elevation forest service lands.

California Ground SQUIRRELS, or gray diggers, are very active this time of year. The best hunting opportunities for squirrels are generally found on private agricultural ground, but good opportunity also exists on White River Wildlife area. Focus your efforts in the morning or evening to find the highest squirrel activity. Make sure to ask permission to hunt on private lands.

WHITE RIVER WILDLIFE AREA

BEAR and COUGAR hunting opened Aug. 1. BEAR hunters will find the best success adjacent to major drainages such as White River, Tygh Creek or Badger Creek.

COYOTE hunters should be looking in open areas along the eastern perimeter of the wildlife area.

GROUND SQUIRRELS, or gray diggers, can be found throughout the wildlife area.

The wildlife area is a vehicle regulated use area. Open roads have a green dot on them. Hunters bringing their ATVs are reminded that all vehicles are to stay on roads; cross country travel is prohibited. As summer progresses, fire danger increases. Please be aware of current fire regulations and their impact on the wildlife area.

Fire restrictions are in affect and ATVs and motorcycles are prohibited on all unimproved roads and any road with vegetation growing in the middle of the road way they also have to have fire tools and fire extinguisher with any vehicle traveling on these roads. You may find out more about fire restrictions and regulations by contacting the Oregon Department of Forestry in The Dalles, Oregon at (541)296-4626.

CENTRAL ZONE VIEWING

Mountain goat in Sherman County

There have been multiple sightings of a mountain goat in Sherman County. The first sighting was just above Mack’s Canyon campground. The most recent reports of this goat were in the Wagonblast area. Local biologists are interested in keeping track of this wandering goat. If anyone has more information, please contact the Mid-Columbia District office at 541-296-4628.

Crook County

The Ochoco National Forest in Crook County offers a chance to see a variety of woodpeckers including the Lewis, Northern Flicker, White-headed, Pileated and several of the smaller varieties. While the birds could be seen anywhere on the forest, generally the higher elevation more heavily forested north slopes will offer the best viewing opportunities. Forest maps, hiking boots, binoculars and plenty of water are a must for the serious observer.

Prineville Area

White pelicans have been seen using Ochoco Reservoir, Prineville Reservoir and Houston Lake, which is unusual for this area. Flocks of 50-100 birds were seen on Prineville Reservoir.

Ducks and geese are visible along the Crooked River and Prineville Reservoir Wildlife Management Area. Additionally, a variety of other shorebirds and birds of prey are present along the shoreline and rimrock areas. The access road along the north side of Prineville Reservoir through the wildlife area is open and offers great camping, hiking and wildlife viewing opportunities. A map of the area is available at the ODFW’s Prineville Office and the Oregon State Park office located at the Prineville Reservoir State Park.

Directions to the wildlife area: From Prineville, take Paulina Highway 1.7 miles. Turn right onto Juniper Canyon Road at the Prineville Reservoir State Park sign. Take Juniper Canyon Road 12.5 miles to Prineville Reservoir State Park. Access to the WMA is via the primitive N. Side Access road at the northeast corner of the state park. Visitors can also access the WMA by continuing southeast along Paulina Highway for 15 miles (from Prineville) and turn right at the bottom of the hill after passing Eagle Rock near milepost 14 onto the signed WMA primitive road. For more information, visit ODFW’s Web site.

Sherman County and Deschutes Canyon

Many different species frequent the Deschutes Canyon at this time of year with opportunities to view a wide variety of waterbirds, passerines, deer and bighorn sheep. Bighorn sheep are a common site in the canyon. One of the most popular spots to view Bighorn rams is across the river from Jones campground, along the Mack’s canyon access road. Bighorn ewes are now congregating in large cliff areas. One area where visitors can view bighorn lambs is in the cliffs across from Beavertail campground along the Mack’s canyon access road. Sheep are most active in the early morning and late evening during warm summer days. Good binoculars and a spotting scope will improve the odds of viewing sheep.

There have been multiple sightings of a mountain goat in Sherman County. The first sighting was just above Mack’s Canyon campground. The most recent reports of this goat were in the Wagonblast area. Local biologists are interested in keeping track of this wandering goat. If anyone has more information, please contact the Mid-Columbia District office at 541-296-4628.

The Dalles Area

ODFW White River Wildlife Area

Visitors to White River can find a variety of bird species on the area. Some of the most notable are Lewis’ Woodpeckers, which inhabit the open oak areas throughout the wildlife area and Pileated Woodpeckers, which can generally be found near the forest boundary. The area also hosts a variety of passerines, as well as turkey, quail and a few waterfowl. For more information and directions to the wildlife area, visit ODFW’s Web site.

ODFW Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area

Note: Fire season is in full swing, will extreme fire danger occurring throughout the region. Be cautious when recreating in the area. Check with the Prineville district of the BLM for current fire regulations.

Many different bird species are present in the Deschutes Wildlife Area, including osprey, kingfishers, great blue herons and waterfowl. ODFW’s Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area is located east of The Dalles. Directions and more information about the Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area are on ODFW’s Web site.

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out. The InciWeb site lists Oregon fires and land manager sites (below) may list closures and restrictions.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

FISHING

Weekend fishing opportunities:

* Water levels on the Lower Owyhee River remain stable below the dam and fishing remains fair to good for rainbow and brown trout.
* Fishing on the Blitzen River has been fair to good for trout, with mostly 8 to 12-inch trout in the Page Springs area, and a few larger trout higher in the system.
* Fishing for trout has been good on Duncan Reservoir, which will get an unscheduled stocking of trout in time for the Labor Day weekend.

ANA RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, hybrid bass

Ana Reservoir is open year-round for rainbow trout and hybrid bass angling. Water temperatures in the reservoir stay fairly consistent throughout the summer. This is a good place to go fishing when other reservoirs get too warm and are not producing. A record size 30 inch hybrid bass was caught in early February weighing 18lb, 9.5 oz. Many hybrid bass anglers fish at night. Jigging large lures or fishing bait on the bottom of the reservoir are the most common angling methods. The use of live fish for bait is prohibited.

ANA RIVER: hatchery rainbow trout

Rainbow trout in this river can be very spooky so stealth is required. Bait angling is allowed. Tui chub and pit roach are abundant in Ana River so large lures and flies mimicking minnows can be very successful. Water temperatures gradually increase from the outlet of the reservoir down to the culvert on the county road. Most rainbow trout appear to be concentrated from the head of the river down to around the Desert Spring hatchery complex.

ANTHONY LAKE: rainbow and brook trout

Fishing should be good for rainbow trout. The lake has been stocked twice.

BALM CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, bass

Trout fishing is fair for 10 to 14-inch fish.

BEULAH RESERVOIR: redband trout, hatchery rainbow trout, whitefish, bull trout
The reservoir is at minimum water level and average inflow was 44 cfs on August 23. Angling in the reservoir and below the dam is poor.
BIG ROCK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout
The reservoir is at half-full or less, fishing for rainbow trout has been slow.
BLITZEN RIVER: trout

Flows remain stable, ranging from approximately 38 cfs to 45 cfs from Aug. 17 through Aug. 24. Angling has been fair to good for trout, with mostly 8 to 12-inch trout in the Page Springs area, and a few larger trout higher in the system. Mainstem Blitzen and tributaries (except Little Blitzen) have a two fish trout bag limit from late May through Oct. 31, and a catch-and-release fishery from Nov. 1 through late May. The Little Blitzen is a catch-and-release fishery year-round.

BLUE LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

Blue lake was recently stocked with fingerling-sized hatchery rainbow trout. Access to Blue Lake was closed by the USFS to remove beetle-killed trees and improve safety condition; it is not expected to open again during 2009.

BULLY CREEK RESERVOIR: bass, white crappie, yellow perch, catfish, and trout.

The reservoir was 18 percent full on Aug. 23. This reservoir is predicted to reach minimum water levels early to mid September. Current water level is four feet below the bottom of the ramp, so launching large boats would be difficult. Angling is slow.

BURNS POND: trout, bass

Angling should be slow for rainbow trout.

BURNT RIVER: trout

Fishing will slow as the weather stays warm. Fish early or late in the day.

CAMPBELL RESERVOIR (KLAMATH COUNTY): redband trout, largemouth bass, crappie

No recent report. The reservoir is half-full.

CHEWAUCAN RIVER: redband trout, largemouth bass

Redband trout are available in the main river and tributaries; brook trout are available in Dairy and Elder Creeks. The Chewaucan River just above Paisley has been producing good catch rates on fish 8-12 inches. Angling in the lower river, below Paisley and in Rivers End Reservoir for largemouth bass has been very good. With increasing water temperatures bass fishing is expected to slow. Fishing back eddies, in the current, and pulling lures deeper in the reservoir along the old river channel will help improve catch rates. Rivers End Reservoir is privately owned, but public access to the reservoir is available on the northeast side of the gravelford bridge off HWY 31, or by contacting the landowner for permission.

CHICKAHOMINY RESERVOIR: trout

The reservoir is very low, the water is turbid, and we have received reports some trout are dying. With low water and warm weather, we will probably lose the trout this summer.

COTTONWOOD MEADOWS LAKE: brook trout, hatchery stocked rainbow trout

Fishing for hatchery stocked rainbow trout has been good, and catch rates on brook trout have become slow. Vegetation in the lake can make angling challenging; try trolling lures and flies over the top of them near the center of the lake.

COTTONWOOD RESERVOIR: native redband trout

Fishing has been slow. The reservoir is still very turbid; large flashy lures and flies are producing near the inlet of Cottonwood Creek.

CRUMP LAKE: crappie, largemouth bass, brown bullhead

The lake went almost entirely dry in 2007. Crump Lake is very turbid, the best fishing areas tend to be near the mouth of Deep Creek at the North end of the lake. There is a primitive boat ramp on the east side of the lake. Crappie catch rates should improve this year with better water conditions.

DEADHORSE/CAMPBELL LAKES: hatchery rainbow trout, brook trout

The USFS closed access to the lakes in 2008. Deadhorse will not open duing 2009, Campbell will likely not open until late fall at the earliest. The lakes will not be stocked in 2009. Questions concerning the closure should be directed to the Paisley Ranger Station at (541) 943-3114.

DELINTMENT LAKE: trout

Fair angling for rainbow trout. Most anglers have been catching 10 to 12-inch trout, but a few have reported catching 12 to 14-inch holdover trout from last year. Extensive aquatic vegetation may make angling somewhat challenging.
DEMING CREEK: redband trout, bull trout
The creek is open to fishing but it is rare to catch redband trout over eight inches in this very small stream. Angling is closed for bull trout.
DEVILS LAKE: yellow perch, largemouth bass, brown bullhead
Angling is fair for yellow perch and brown bullhead.
DOG LAKE: largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, brown bullhead

The retention of redband trout is prohibited; the lake is not stocked with hatchery trout. Largemouth bass angling has slowed with declining water levels and increasing temperatures. Trolling lures in deeper water and targeting the weed line with jigs can improve catch rates. Yellow perch fishing at night has been good recently.

DREWS RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, brown bullhead, channel catfish, redband trout

Access is open to the reservoir, water at the boat ramp is very low and the dock is out of the water completely. The water is low in the reservoir and very turbid; it will continue to decline through the summer. Channel catfish and largemouth bass fishing has been slow.

DUNCAN RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Recent fishing reports show good catch rates on hatchery stocked legal and trophy-sized trout. Water temperatures are declining and the reservoir will receive an unscheduled stocking of legal-sized trout before Labor Day weekend.

EAGLE CREEK: rainbow trout

Rainbow trout were re-stocked in July.

FISH LAKE (Steens Mountain): brook trout, rainbow trout

Angling is fair to good for 8 to 12-inch rainbow trout and fair for 8 to 10-inch brook trout.

FISH LAKE (Halfway): rainbow and brook trout

The lake has been stocked with legal-sized rainbow trout. Fishing should be good.
FOURMILE LAKE: rainbow trout, lake trout, kokanee, brook trout
Lake trout have moved to deeper water and angling has slowed. Larger lake trout are available as two seven pound lake trout were caught in a net by ODFW in October of 2006. Trolling lures by boat in deep water can be effective. Rainbow trout are also being captured whereas brook trout and kokanee are being caught at a lesser rate. The wind usually picks up in the afternoon so fish early and late if you are fishing from a boat. Covering lots of water by trolling various lures can be effective. A good fish finder can be helpful. The lake trout are hungry so finding them is more important than the type of bait, lure or fly you use.
GERBER RESERVOIR: crappie, yellow perch, brown bullhead and largemouth bass
Angling is slow for all fish. Largemouth bass are available but are difficult to locate and catch. Brown bullhead and small yellow perch are available to bank anglers fishing with bait.
GRANDE RONDE LAKE: rainbow and brook trout
Fishing is good for rainbow and brook trout. Some trout may have small white parasites on them. They do not affect the flesh and are harmless to humans. These parasites occur each year when the water gets warm.

HAINES POND: rainbow trout

Fishing is slow.

HART LAKE: crappie, brown bullhead, largemouth bass

Catch rates for crappie last summer were very good. The lake is very low. The lake is only 2-3 feet deep in most places. Launching large boats is impossible from the primitive boat ramp, as is running a boat engine in the lake.

HEART LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout, kokanee

The lake is full. Fishing reports have been very good for kokanee and good for rainbow trout. Last years fingerling plants are just around 8 inches, please be careful with undersized fish, they are the base of the fishery in 2010.

HOLBROOK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir has been stocked with trophy and legal-size trout. Fishing reports have been good, but are declining with decreasing water levels and increasing temperatures. Target fishing during the early mornings and late evenings for improved success.

HWY 203 POND: trout, bluegill, bass

Fishing is poor-fair for trout. There also are numerous bluegills for the kids.

JUNIPER LAKE: cutthroat trout

The lake is nearly dry.

KRUMBO RESERVOIR: trout and largemouth bass

The access road is open after recent maintenance. Fair to good angling for largemouth bass. Slow to fair angling for rainbow trout.
KLAMATH AND AGENCY LAKES: redband trout and yellow perch
Angling is poor in most areas. The main part of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes has poor water quality. Fish are still available under the algae but have moved into the spring areas and mouths of the rivers and streams. Redband trout in Agency Lake and Upper Klamath Lake are feeding primarily on minnows, sculpins and leeches at this time. Trolling lures that mimic minnows from a boat is slow. Flyfishing and trolling lures in the spring areas is fair. Water temperatures are high in most areas therefore fish should be captured and released quickly. Anglers should resuscitate the fish before releasing to improve survival.
KLAMATH RIVER: native rainbow-redband trout
The River below Keno Dam to Topsy Reservoir is closed until October 1. The Klamath River from J.C. Boyle Dam bridge crossing to the J. C Boyle Powerhouse provides good angling this time of year for small redband-rainbow trout (6-12 inches) due to low, stable flows from 220 cfs of spring water. Fly-fishing with small dry flies can be excellent this time of year. Small tan caddis are abundant. Angling in the river below the powerhouse is very slow due to high flows (1880 cfs) and murky water but improves in the evening as the river drops. A good caddis and mayfly hatch is occurring in the evening. The best method is casting small flies downstream and letting them swing in the current. Remember the river below JC Boyle Dam is catch and release for trout.
LA GRANDE RESERVOIR: rainbow, brook trout

Fishing is good for rainbow and brook trout. Flies and lures only.
LAKE OF THE WOODS: hatchery rainbow trout, kokanee, hatchery brown trout, yellow perch, brown bullhead, largemouth bass, crappie, and smallmouth bass
Angling will be slow for rainbow trout. The rainbow trout will be out in the middle of the lake in deeper water as water temperatures are warm in the shallows. Visit Lakeofthewoodsresort.com for more information. Yellow perch and brown bullhead are available to bank anglers. Most yellow perch are very small so use small bait or flies. There is a good population of brown bullhead and a worm fished just off the bottom in the evening can be very effective. Largemouth bass are available near the dock areas along the lake and in the shallow vegetation along the edges of the lake. Angling for largemouth bass has been good. Kokanee are available near the surface in the early morning near deeper water and migrate to deep water during the day. Large brown trout are typically holding under the kokanee or near structure along the shoreline.
LINK RIVER: redband trout

The river is very green due to an algae bloom in Upper Klamath Lake and angling is very slow as most redband trout have moved out of the river.

LOFTON RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Catch rates have declined with increasing water temperatures and fishing will be slow until fall weather puts fish back on the bite. Target rainbow trout in the early mornings and late evenings during the interim period. Illegally introduced tui chub begin to interfere with trout fishing during the summer and fall months. Try fishing the deeper sections of the reservoir to avoid tui chub and position lures and flies in likely positions to attract trout. The reservoir will receive an unscheduled stocking of legal-sized trout before Labor Day weekend.

LONG CREEK: redband trout, brook trout and bull trout

Angling should be good for brook trout and redband trout. Most fish run small (6-8 inches). Dry fly fishing should be good.

LONG CREEK RESERVOIR – Unity: rainbow

Should be good for rainbow trout.

LOST RIVER: brown bullhead, yellow perch, crappie, largemouth bass, bluegill

Angling is poor for brown bullhead and yellow perch using bait at the Crystal Springs day use area. A few largemouth bass can also be captured under or near the Crystal Springs Bridge.

LUCKY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Fishing reports have been good. Water temperatures will increase though the summer. The reservoir is very turbid; large flashy lures/flies and scent attractants are recommended.

MALHEUR RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The water level is low, and the boat ramp is not useable. Bank angling at this reservoir is limited due to low water level and weed beds that extend out from shore. The best access points for bank anglers are located inside the neck. The reservoir will probably go dry in September. Catch rates are slow.

MALHEUR RIVER (Warm Springs Reservoir downstream to South Fork Malheur River): redband trout and hatchery rainbow trout

Flows below Warm Springs Reservoir are dropping fast, which indicates the reservoir above is at minimum water level. Angling for trout is poor.

MALHEUR RIVER (from the South Fork Malheur River near Riverside, downstream to Gold Creek): redband trout and hatchery rainbow trout.

Flows in the Juntura area are dropping fast. By Aug. 24 water releases should be at run-of-the-river (69 cfs). Angling for trout is poor.

MALHEUR RIVER, NORTH FORK: redband trout, whitefish, and bull trout

No recent angling report. Remember to release bull trout.

MALHEUR RIVER, MIDDLE FORK: redband trout, brook trout, and bull trout

No recent angling report. Trout angling should be fair to good. Remember to release bull trout.

MANN LAKE: trout

No recent angling report. The lake is very low, and illegally introduced goldfish have disrupted the trout fishery.
MILLER LAKE: brown trout, kokanee, rainbow trout
Angling has been slow for rainbow trout from shore. Trophy brown trout are available. Kokanee are rare and are typically under eight inches in length. Water temperatures are warm and fish have moved to deeper water at about 15 feet. Fishing is more productive from a boat to be able to access these fish. Angling is best very early and very late for brown trout. Remember you can fish 24 hours a day on Miller Lake.
MILL FLAT RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Aquatic vegetation in the lake can make angling challenging. Dry flies mimicking hatches placed on top of the vegetation and deep diving lures along the weed line can produce large rainbow trout.

MOON RESERVOIR: bass, trout

The reservoir was very low after last irrigation season, but filled this spring. No recent angling report.

MUD LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

Mud Lake is very low; fishing is expected to be slow until fall. Fall sampling in 2008 showed lots of fish available to the angler, most in the 8 to 10-inch size range.

MURRAY RESERVOIR: trout

No recent report, but fishing should be fair to good.

NORTH FORK SPRAGUE RIVER: Brown trout, redband trout, brook trout, bull trout

Flows in the North Fork Sprague are low. Angling should be good for redband trout and brown trout. Brown trout are found in the deeper pools and near any large wood in the river. Target the shady areas for brown trout with sculpin fly patterns or small lures mimicking minnows. Brown trout will also take caddis and terrestrial patterns. Redband trout are typically in the fast moving water out in the middle of the river.

NORTH MALHEUR BLM STOCK PONDS: rainbow trout

No recent angling report. Pence Springs, Peavine, South Cottonwood, South Mountain, and Squaw Creek reservoirs were stocked with fingerling rainbow trout on May 29. Littlefield Reservoir has a good carryover population with fish running 12 to 15 inches. Squaw Creek Reservoir also has good number fish up to about 13 inches.

NORTH POWDER POND 1: rainbow trout

Fishing is slow.

OBENCHAIN RESERVOIR: bluegill, largemouth bass

The landowner has closed access to Obenchain Reservoir due to vandalism. Access is by permission only.

OWYHEE RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, catfish

The reservoir was 30 percent full on Aug. 24. Water level is below the bottom of the ramps at McCormick State Park and Leslie Gulch. Other boat ramps are open for normal use. Good fishing for crappie, and slow to fair angling for bass.

OWYHEE RIVER (Lower): brown trout and hatchery rainbow trout
Flows below the dam have been fairly stable, ranging from 205 to 210 cfs over the last few weeks. Fishing for rainbow and brown trout is fair to good.

OWYHEE RIVER (Upper): smallmouth bass and channel catfish
Discharge at the Rome gauge dropped to 148 cfs on Aug. 23. Fishing for smallmouth and channel catfish should be fair to good.

OVERTON RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Few trout were captured during sampling in the fall of 2008. Catch rates have been very low. Few fish are available in the lake. The aquatic vegetation that sits on the surface of the reservoir is difficult to fish through.

PIUTE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout and hatchery Lahontan cutthroat trout

Rainbow and cutthroat trout are available. The reservoir is holding at two to four acres. The reservoir will likely go dry this summer, and will not be stocked. Catch-and-release fishing is not recommended in the lake as most of these fish will likely winter kill if the reservoir does not go completely dry.

PHILLIPS RESERVOIR: trout, perch

Fishing is fair for trout 10 to 12 inches with most fish being caught near the dam. Perch fishing is slow. Fish are 8-10 inches. Some bass are being caught as well. The reservoir is 74 percent full.

PILCHER RESERVOIR: trout

Crappie fishing is slow-fair for 8 to 9-inch fish. Trout fishing is fair.

PINE CREEK and NORTH PINE (Halfway): rainbow

Fish were stocked in June. Fishing near Cornucopia is usually good.

POWDER RIVER: trout, spring chinook

Fishing for rainbow trout is fair below Mason Dam.

ROGGERS POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Legal-size trout are available from last years planting. Bring mosquito repellent to improve your fishing experience.
SEVENMILE CREEK: brown trout, brook trout, redband trout
Brook trout are abundant from Nicholson road upstream to headwaters. Brown trout and redband trout are very rare in this section. The lower section below Nicholson Road is on private property therefore permission is needed to fish.

SHERLOCK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout
Fall sampling showed lots of trout in the 10 to 12-inch size range. Recent fishing reports show lots of trout available in the 8-inch size range. Water temperatures will continue to increase until fall. Fishing in the late evenings, when heavy hatching and active feeding is occurring is likely to improve success.

SOUTH FORK SPRAGUE RIVER: redband trout, brook trout, brown trout

Flows in the South Fork Sprague are low and angling should be fair for redband trout and brown trout. Most of the redband trout caught range from 6-14 inches. Large brown trout over 20 inches are available. Most brook trout are located upstream near Corral and Camp Creek. Brook trout are abundant in this section but most of them are small (6-8 inches). Campgrounds in this area will be closed for several weeks. Please contact the Fremont National Forest for more information.

SOUTH MALHEUR BLM STOCK PONDS: hatchery rainbow trout

No recent angling report. Many of the ponds in the Jordan Valley area were stocked with fingerling trout on June 2 or 3. Several reservoirs north of Jordan Valley have carryover populations.

SPAULDING RESERVOIR:

Spaulding reservoir went dry in 2007 and has not sufficiently refilled to support fish. The reservoir will not be stocked this spring.

SPRAGUE RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, largemouth bass, brown bullhead, yellow perch.

Angling should be slow for redband trout as they move to cooler water as air temperatures increase. Look for redband trout along the spring areas of the river and the higher gradient sections. Bait angling for brown bullhead and yellow perch should be good in between Saddle Mtn. Pitt Bridge and Godowa Springs Road. The Chiloquin Dam has been removed and angling regulation signs have been posted at the prior dam location.
SPENCER CREEK: redband trout and brook trout
Angling will be excellent for small redband-rainbow (4 to 8-inch) trout. The upper reaches just below Buck Lake have small brook trout available.
SUMMIT POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Legal-sized rainbow trout are available from last years planting. Bring mosquito repellent to improve your fishing experience.

SUNSTONE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir will likely go dry this summer and will not be stocked.

SYCAN RIVER: redband trout, brown trout and brook trout

Angling should be slow in most areas including the canyon near Coyote Bucket for small redband trout 6-12 inches. Angling should be good for brook trout above Pikes Crossing. Large brown trout over 20 inches are available. Brook trout are more abundant above Pikes crossing and redband trout are more abundant below. The Sycan River is a great place to fish if you do not want to see another angler. Campgrounds in this area will be closed for several weeks. Please contact the Fremont National Forest for more information. Flows are very low and water temperature is high in most areas of the Sycan River below Pikes Crossing.

THIEF VALLEY RESERVOIR: trout

Fishing has slowed. The water level is dropping and is 59 percent full. The dirt road that follows the reservoir has been upgraded to provide good access to the Powder River below the dam. Public access only goes approximately 1,000 ft below the dam. Please respect private property and remain within 1,000 ft of the dam.

THOMPSON VALLEY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, largemouth bass
The reservoir is very full, the boat ramps are usable. Water temperatures will continue to increase through the summer months. Algae blooms often occur on the reservoir during late summer. Seek out largemouth bass and trout in deeper sections of the reservoir. Water temperatures are declining and the reservoir will receive an unscheduled stocking of legal sized trout before Labor Day weekend.
TOPSY RESERVOIR: brown bullhead, largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, yellow perch, pumpkinseed, goldfish
Angling is slow for warmwater fish. Fishing for brown bullhead or yellow perch would be your best bet at this time. Largemouth bass are starting to be captured in the backwater areas. Bass fishing is best from a boat.
TWIN LAKES (Halfway): rainbow
Fishing is fair for rainbow trout. The lake has been stocked with legal rainbow trout.
UNITY RESERVOIR: trout, bass, crappie

Fishing is fair for trout. Crappie fishing is very good off the dock. Water level is at 44 percent.

VEE LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

The lake is full, legal and trophy-sized trout were planted recently and fishing reports from the lake have been very good.

WARM SPRINGS RESERVOIR: smallmouth bass, white crappie, catfish, perch, and hatchery rainbow trout
The reservoir is at minimum water level. Inflows averaged 25 cfs on Aug. 23. No recent angling report.

WARNER LAKES (Hart and Crump Lakes are listed separately): crappie

The northern Warner Lakes are dry.

WARNER POND: hatchery rainbow trout
This is a great place to fly-fish and take young anglers. Many large rainbow trout are available in this small pond.
LOWER WILLIAMSON RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, brook trout
Angling has slowed as the river has dropped and cleared. Pressure has been high on the fish. Smaller redband trout are abundant and aggressive. Please release these fish carefully as they are future trophy trout. ODFW suggests using barbless hooks in this fishery. Small trico mayflies are hatching in the early morning.
UPPER WILLIAMSON RIVER: redband trout and brook trout

Flows are low but water clarity is fair. Bring your mosquito repellant as mosquitoes are abundant. Angling should be good for redband trout and brook trout on public land and exceptional on the private land. Anglers have the opportunity to pay to fish on the Sand Creek Ranch and the Yamsi Ranch.

WILLOW VALLEY RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill, crappie

Angling is slow for warmwater fish. The largemouth bass population might have experienced a winter kill. The reservoir is currently low and boat anglers should be aware of log hazards. New angling regulations are in place that allow only one bass harvested per day greater than 15 inches in length. Crappie angling is slow but large crappie are available. Bluegill are abundant but small is size.

WOLF CREEK RESERVOIR: crappie, trout

Fishing from the dock for crappie is good with 8 to 9-inch fish being taken. Trout fishing is fair.

WOOD RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, brook trout.

The Wood River was accidentally omitted from the 2009 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations. The Wood River angling regulations remain catch-and-release for trout from April 25- October 31. Water clarity has improved greatly. Some anglers are doing well angling with lures and spoons for brown trout above Loosley Road. Most anglers below Weed Road have reported poor angling. Angling for redband trout should improve as redband trout are starting to move into the river in good numbers. Grasshoppers are abundant and can be an effective fly for brown trout from the USFS day use area to Weed Road crossing.

YELLOWJACKET LAKE: trout

Angling has been fair for 10 to 13-inch rainbow trout. Anglers have had success with a variety of gear. Extensive aquatic vegetation may make angling somewhat challenging.

SOUTHEAST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER and ELK (opens Aug. 29), MOURNING DOVE and FOREST GROUSE (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

EVENT
Pheasant hunt, Klamath Falls Wildlife Area, Sept. 19-20. A Becoming an Outdoor Woman Event for those 18 and over. Come and enjoy a half-day session on shotgun skills training and two separate pheasant hunts (one Saturday afternoon and one Sunday morning). Fee $65, includes a continental breakfast and lunch on Saturday, and a continental breakfast on Sunday morning. All equipment will be provided. Register using this online PDF form or contact Mark Newell, 503-947-6018: mark.newell@state.or.us

Don’t forget to report your hunt results. Anyone who purchases a big game or turkey tag must report hunt results online or by phone. Reporting is required even if you did not fill your tag or go hunting. More information

HARNEY COUNTY

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

COYOTE hunting has been slow due to relatively low population levels associated with a low period in cyclic rabbit and rodent populations. Coyotes are generally scattered on summer ranges. The highest concentrations are associated with irrigated private land where there are good numbers of mice or other small rodents. Hunters are reminded to ask permission before entering private lands. Be aware that bobcats and cougars may respond to predator calls, and separate licensing and open season limitations exist for these species.

KLAMATH COUNTY

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

COYOTE hunting has returned to summer conditions as coyotes have dispersed onto summer territories. The highest densities of coyotes at this time of year are often near wetlands and irrigated pastures where young waterfowl and rodents are in abundance. Hunters are reminded that the Lower Klamath Lake Wildlife Refuge and Klamath Marsh Wildlife Refuge are closed to coyote hunting, and hunters should always ask for permission before entering private ground.

KLAMATH WILDLIFE AREA

Hunting seasons are now closed.

Overnight camping is not allowed on the Miller Island Unit. Discharge of firearms is prohibited except by permit. If you have any questions, please contact Klamath Wildlife Area at (541) 883-5734.

Some wetland units in Subunit B are dry to facilitate habitat management activities to reduce encroaching bulrush and cattail and increase open water for waterfowl and shorebird use.

LAKE COUNTY

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

COYOTE numbers appear to be very low throughout the county. The best numbers are near the crested wheatgrass seedlings in the southern portion of the Wagontire unit. Populations in forest habitats also are more abundant and calling around natural forest openings can be productive.

SUMMER LAKE WILDLIFE AREA

This section of the report was last updated Aug. 18, 2009.

All hunting seasons on the Wildlife Area are now closed.

Discharging firearms is prohibited except by permit.

MALHEUR COUNTY

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

UPLAND BIRD Production

Chukar

Rains in May and June were a mixed blessing for chukar production. In areas where the rains were not too heavy the result was excellent range conditions and good production of chukar. However, in some areas high rainfall intensity resulted in loss of production. The good news is we are seeing evidence of re-nesting and hopefully good survival of these late broods.

Chukar surveys on established routes yielded 32 chukar per 10 miles and production of 8.3 chicks per brood. This is well above the 17 per 10 miles measured last year, but still below the 10 year average of 55 birds per 10 miles.

The only area not exhibiting much recovery from last years low count was the Succor Creek /Leslie Gulch area. It is likely that heavy rains during the nesting period impacted this area harder than some others. The poor range conditions caused by ongoing invasion of medusahead likely limits the ability of birds in this area to successfully re-nest and raise broods.

Pheasant

Pheasant numbers vary widely according to the availability of winter cover in a particular area. The surveys along established routes were similar to last years with 6.5 birds per 10 miles but 26% below the 10 year average. Chick production was good, averaging 5.2 chicks per brood. Hunting prospects will vary depending on the farming practices in the area you have permission to hunt. The outlying areas around Willow Creek, Vale and Adrian have higher bird numbers than areas closer to Ontario and Nyssa.

California quail

Like Chukar, the quail benefited from good brood rearing conditions this year. Surveys on established routes showed 35 quail per 10 miles up from 20 last year and on par with the 10 year average. Production was 8.4 chicks per brood and there are still new broods being hatched. Hunting prospects in the rangeland areas should be improved over last year. Hunting around the irrigated agricultural areas should be similar to recent years.

COYOTE hunting has been slow due to relatively low population levels associated with a low period in cyclic rabbit and rodent populations. Hunters are reminded to ask permission before entering private lands. Be aware that bobcats and cougars may respond to predator calls, and separate licensing and open season limitations exist for these species.

SOUTHEAST ZONE VIEWING

Harney County

Look around green agricultural fields or wetlands in the early mornings and evenings to see deer and antelope while they are actively feeding during the cool part of the day.

Fall shorebird migration is underway and waterowl migration activity should pick up within the next few weeks, however viewing opportunities are limited due to low water conditions. Many resident shorebirds, like ibis and avocets, have already moved out of the area. Canada geese can be seen congregating on private farmlands within the Harney Basin especially were flood irrigation is occurring.

The best bird viewing opportunity is Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge offers excellent viewing opportunities at the refuge headquarters, along the Central Patrol Road, and near Page Springs.

Klamath Falls Area

Owl species including great-horned, barn, screech and short-eared owls can be observed just after dark around agricultural and foothill areas as they start hunting for rodents, snakes, and other small prey. Great gray owls are found at higher elevation forested areas usually adjacent to meadows and small forest openings.

Sightings of duck broods are now common around rivers and lakes in the Klamath Basin. Canada geese are now flying and can be observed flying from water out to agricultural lands to forage. Western and Clark’s grebes have largely finished courtship, but can still be observed on Upper Klamath Lake and surrounding waterways. These two species look very similar in plumage but are distinguished by head and bill coloration. Bald eagles have hatched in most nest sites, and young eagles can occasionally be observed in the nest as they grow from nestlings into fledglings. The breeding pair at Moore Park can be observed from the lower parts of the park.

Klamath Wildlife Area

This section was updated on August 4.

Non-motorized access remains available on all dikes and roads throughout the Wildlife Area.

Waterbird numbers are somewhat stable. Viewers can expect to find good numbers of breeding waterfowl, shorebirds, other waterbirds and marsh dwelling passerines throughout the next several months

Since the breeding season for nearly all nesting species is underway at this time, viewers are urged to use great care not to disturb nesting birds or broods. Overnight camping is not allowed on the Miller Island Unit.

Waterfowl

Breeding season for ducks such as mallard, cinnamon teal and gadwall continues and most hens are rearing broods. Duck broods can be commonly observed for nearly all nesting species. It is the peak of hatching for gadwall now and broods are becoming very apparent. Waterfowl have spread out across the entire area. Resident Canada geese are dispersed widely across the Wildlife Area and adjacent private lands. Canada geese have regained their flight feathers and have regained their flight capabilities.

Shorebirds, waders and other waterbirds

American avocets and black-necked stilts are very numerous at this time, with incubation and brood rearing well underway. Viewers can expect to find increased number of migrant shorebirds staging on the Wildlife Area in the next several weeks.

Wading birds are scattered widely across the Wildlife Area. Great egrets and white pelicans are fairly numerous at this time and occasionally a snowy egret can be observed. Most sandhill crane pairs remain dispersed in their nesting territories and colts are nearing flight capabilities.

Raptors and Others

Resident raptors remain scattered throughout the Wildlife Area. Most resident birds are actively rearing young at this time. Fields offer excellent foraging opportunities for many raptors.

Upland game birds

California quail pairs are dispersed widely across the Area and there has been some late nesting. Several broods have been observed recently. Mourning doves are fairly numerous and are commonly heard calling throughout the day.

Passerines

Passerine (perching) species, especially sparrows, finches and warblers remain fairly common around the Headquarters complex and historic homestead areas (Hooper, Delameter, Rayson, and Gregory). Song sparrows, marsh wrens and common yellowthroat are very vocal in emergent marsh areas at present. Red-winged and yellow-headed blackbirds are actively nesting throughout the emergent marsh areas. All common swallow species are very active in their nesting efforts. Cliff, barn and tree swallows are very common at Headquarters.

Viewers can expect to continue to have good photo and viewing opportunities for nesting and brood rearing species. This is an excellent time, since all species are in their brilliant breeding plumage. As fall migration progresses, viewers may be treated to rare or unusual species. Please check the Wildlife Observation Record in the Headquarters Lobby for rare and unusual observations and other species of interest.

Facilities and Access

The entire area is open to public access. Non-motorized travel is permitted on lateral and other minor dikes. The entire Wildlife Area is closed to cross country motor vehicle or ATV travel.

Viewers are urged to keep pets in close control; there are still some late nesting birds.. Many shorebird species are nesting or rearing along road edges at this time and are very vulnerable to disturbance, please use caution when driving or walking in these areas.

Habitat

Recent warm daytime temperatures have resulted in very robust emergent vegetation that is actively growing. As evapotranspiration rates increase, and pond levels recede, shallowly flooded wetland edges and mudflats are becoming more apparent. These sites are very attractive to foraging waterbirds and are receiving heavy use. Invertebrate activity has increased dramatically and large columns of midges are very apparent on sunny days. Mosquitoes are beginning to become active and are providing another abundant food source. Many waterbird species and other insectivorous birds are taking advantage these excellent food sources at this time.

Upland habitats are in very good condition with forbs and grasses readily available for food. As upland habitats begin to dry and grass to cure, please be especially cautious with any types of fire ignition sources.

Some wetland units in Subunit B are dry to facilitate habitat management activities to reduce encroaching bulrush and cattail and increase open water for waterfowl and shorebird use. If you have any questions, please contact Klamath Wildlife Area at (541) 883-5734. For more information, visit ODFW Web site.

Lake County and Lakeview Area

Fall migration has started for shorebirds and the earliest waterfowl. There have been substantial increases in shorebirds along the mudflats of Lake Abert and Hart Lake in the Warner Valley. This time of year shorebirds are in eclipse plumage which makes identification of the peeps considerably more challenging.

Summer Lake Wildlife Area

This section was updated on August 18. Vehicle access to the Wildlife Viewing Loop will generally remain open through summer and into early fall. Viewers need to be aware that during the next 6 weeks there will be considerable habitat enhancement activities taking place. Expect heavy truck traffic on the Headquarters Road out to Windbreak dike and about half the way out to Bullgate Campground. Windbreak dike road is temporarily closed due to construction activity. Temporary closures of the Wildlife Viewing Loop may occur due to the habitat development and maintenance activities. Access to the eastside of the Wildlife Area remains open and available back to River Campground from the northern portion of the Wildlife Viewing Loop. Bullgate dike and the Work Road are now open to motor vehicle traffic. Lateral and minor dikes remain closed. Windbreak Dike will remain temporarily closed to all access through most of the month of September.

Non-motorized access remains available on all dikes and roads (except Windbreak dike and road which is temporarily closed to all access) throughout the Wildlife Area.

Waterbird numbers are fluctuating now with the breeding season winding down and fall migration picking up tremendously. Over the weekend large numbers of several species of shorebirds increased dramatically in number. Viewers can expect to find good numbers of breeding and migrant waterfowl, shorebirds, other waterbirds and marsh dwelling passerines throughout the next several months.

Since the breeding season for nearly most nesting species continues at this time, viewers are urged to use great care not to disturb nesting birds or broods. Dogs need to be kept in close control. Running or training of dogs is prohibited except by permit.

Waterfowl

Breeding season for ducks such as mallard, cinnamon teal and gadwall continues and most hens are rearing broods. Duck broods can be commonly observed for nearly all nesting species. It is the peak of brood rearing for gadwall is now and broods are becoming very apparent and widespread. Waterfowl have spread out across the entire area. Resident Canada geese are dispersed widely across the Wildlife Area and adjacent private lands. Molting ducks are very numerous but are difficult to see. During this critical time period where they are flightless, they remain close to heavy cover.

Shorebirds, waders and other waterbirds

Black-necked stilts remain fairly numerous at this time and most American avocets have flocked-up into large post-breeding season assemblages and can be found in large number at the head of Summer Lake. Killdeer have formed large groups in preparation for migration and sometime 50-100 birds can be found at graveled parking areas and campgrounds.

Large flocks of post-breeding shorebirds are beginning to form. Fall migration is intensifying as northern breeding species are appearing and are staging in fair numbers. Viewers can expect to find increased number of migrant shorebirds staging on the Wildlife Area over the next several weeks.

Wading birds are scattered widely across the Wildlife Area. Great egrets and white pelicans are fairly numerous at this time and occasionally a snowy egret can be observed. Post breeding season dispersal of white-faced ibis is occurring now; large flocks of juvenile ibis are common throughout the shallow wetland areas.
Most sandhill crane pairs remain dispersed in their nesting territories and many are actively rearing colts at this time. Most colts are approaching flight stage or are flighted at this time.

Double-crested cormorants, gulls (California and ring-billed) and grebe (eared, pied-billed and western) numbers are fairly stable and nesting for some species continues. Brood rearing is well underway and fall migrants are making a strong showing. American coot, eared and pied-billed grebe chicks are very numerous especially in Link Marsh.

Caspian terns are rearing chicks on the recently constructed island in the E. Link Unit and the floating island in Dutchy Lake. A large number of gulls nested there as well with many fledged chicks being apparent now. The nesting colony is easily viewed from the Wildlife Viewing Loop.

Forster’s and black terns remain fairly numerous at this time are widely dispersed across the Area. Schoolhouse Lake on the northeast portion of the Wildlife Viewing Loop is an excellent location to observe foraging terns.

Raptors and Others

Resident raptors remain scattered throughout the Wildlife Area as well as on private lands along Hwy 31. Fledged young are very apparent at this time. Recently hayed and flooding meadows offer excellent foraging opportunities for many raptors. Northern harriers are especially numerous over marsh and hay meadows. The occasional bald eagle continues to be observed, probably one of the several pairs found in the Summer Lake Valley.

Great-horned owls have fledged and observations of dispersing juveniles are fairly common. The osprey pair nesting in the platform at Ana Reservoir has fledged young at this time.

Upland game birds

California quail pairs are dispersed widely across the Area and several large sized broods have been observed recently. Several ring-necked pheasant broods have been observed at the Turner Place and at other locations. Eurasian collared doves remain fairly numerous (15-20) at Headquarters Complex and are vigorously calling. Mourning doves are fairly numerous and are dispersed widely across the Wildlife Area.

Passerine (perching) species, especially sparrows, finches and warblers remain fairly common around the Headquarters complex, Summer Lake Rest Area, homestead sites and shelter break plantings at the north end of the Area where they are attracted to tree and shrub cover. Breeding species such as black-headed grosbeaks, yellow warblers, Bullock’s orioles and warbling vireos can sometimes still be heard singing. Song sparrows, marsh wrens and common yellowthroat are still vocal in emergent marsh areas at present. Red-winged and yellow-headed blackbird young have fledged and pre-migration flocks are beginning to form. They remain widespread throughout the emergent marsh areas. Cliff, barn and tree swallows are remain fairly common at Headquarters but many of these species have already departed. Bank and northern rough-winged swallows can be found in large flocks foraging over ponds and roosting in the surrounding tall emergent vegetation.
Hummingbirds are very active at feeders found on the Headquarters Complex. Black-chinned, calliope and rufous have all been observed.

Viewers can expect to continue to have good photo and viewing opportunities for brood rearing and migrating bird species. As fall migration progresses, viewers may be treated to rare or unusual species. Please check the Wildlife observation record in the Headquarters Lobby for rare and unusual observations and other species of interest.

Facilities and Access

The entire area is open to public access. The Wildlife Viewing Loop remains open, but Bullgate and Windbreak dikes, all lateral and minor dikes and the Work Road are now closed to motor vehicle travel until August 15. Windbreak Dike will remain temporarily closed to all public access through most of the month of September. Close-up wildlife observation from the Viewing Loop is very good at this time. Viewers need to be aware that during the next 6 weeks there will be considerable habitat enhancement activities taking place. Expect heavy truck traffic on the Headquarters Road out to Windbreak dike and about half the way out to Bullgate Campground. Windbreak dike road is temporarily closed due to construction activity. Temporary closures of the Wildlife Viewing Loop may occur due to the habitat development and maintenance activities. Access to the eastside of the Wildlife Area remains open and available back to River Campground from the northern portion of the Wildlife Viewing Loop.

Non-motorized travel is permitted in these as well as lateral and other minor dikes. Viewers are urged to use caution driving open roads since shoulders and dike edges may be soft and muddy at this time.

The entire Wildlife Area is closed to cross country motor vehicle or ATV travel.

Camping is permitted at three sites on the Wildlife Area (Windbreak Campground is temporarily closed). Campgrounds are primitive but each has vault toilets, trash barrels and a few picnic tables.

Again, viewers are urged to keep pets in close control; the breeding season for many species of ground nesting birds continues and fledging birds are very common.
Habitat

Recent warm daytime temperatures have resulted in very robust emergent vegetation that is actively growing. As evapotranspiration rates increase, and pond levels recede, shallowly flooded wetland edges and mudflats are becoming more apparent. These sites are very attractive to foraging waterbirds and are receiving heavy use. Invertebrate activity has increased dramatically and large columns of midges are very apparent on sunny days. Mosquitoes and Tabidid flys are beginning to become active and are providing another abundant food source. Many waterbird species and other insectivorous birds are taking advantage these excellent food sources at this time.

Water levels are stable to slowing receding throughout most of the Area at this time. Gold Dike Impoundment and the River Ranch units are being drawdown and/or are mostly dry due to habitat enhancement activities that are underway at this time. Meadows and hayfields found on adjacent private lands and in selected locations on the Wildlife Area have been hayed and are being flooded at this time. These intermittently flooded wetlands will provide considerable foraging opportunities to a wide variety of wildlife species.

Upland habitats are in very good condition with forbs and grasses exhibiting tremendous growth and providing an abundant food source to many species.
Please contact Summer Lake Wildlife Area at (541) 943-3152 or e-mail martin.j.stlouis@state.or.us for additional information.

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out. The InciWeb site lists Oregon fires and land manager sites (below) may list closures and restrictions.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

FISHING

NORTH FORK FIRE COMPLEX CLOSURE on the Umatilla National Forest; see InciWeb for map of closure area.

Weekend fishing opportunities
* The John Day pool on the Columbia River offers some great late summer and fall fishing for walleye. The area also provides world class smallmouth bass angling, the smallmouth go on a fall feeding being as juvenile shad begin their outmigration which is happening right now. As water temperatures begin to cool the smallmouth action will continue to heat up.
* Olive lake is a great fall fishing destination for hatchery trout.
ALDRICH PONDS: trout
Fishing is good at the lower pond but poor at the upper pond. Excessive weed growth produced a fish die-off this winter at the upper pond but it was restocked with fingerlings in May.
GRANDE RONDE, WALLOWA, IMNAHA RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES: trout
Trout fishing in the Wallowa, lower Grande Ronde, and Imnaha rivers is fair to good.
Check river flows
HONEYMOON, TEPEE, SALT CREEK, and McGRAW PONDS: Rainbow trout
Ponds on the Wallowa Whitman Forest are providing fair to good angling for stocked rainbow trout.
JUBILEE LAKE: trout

Jubilee Lake has been stocked. Fishing will continue to improve for rainbow trout as fall temperatures arrive and water temperature cools.

JOHN DAY RIVER: trout, bass and channel catfish

Fishing is fair for smallmouth and channel cats, however flows in the lower John Day are now too low for boats. Fishing will improve with the return of cooler weather. No Steelhead have entered the lower river at this time. Trout fishing is good in the upper river, especially in the Middle and South Forks. Spring chinook have arrived and will be holding in the larger pools. They are illegal to keep and we do not allow fishing with lures in the upper North and Middle Forks to prevent fishermen from accidentally hooking them.

Stream flow levels at Service Creek

KINNEY LAKE: trout

Kinney Lake has been stocked with rainbow trout and fishing has been fair to good.

MAGONE LAKE: trout

Fishing for rainbow and brook trout is slow. All fish are being caught in deep water using bait or jigs to reach them. Fishing will improve with the return of cooler weather.

McKAY RESERVIOR: crappie, yellow perch, bass

Crappie and yellow perch fishing is good. The best bite has been in the late evening. Largemouth bass fishing has been fair to good.

MCNARY, HATROCK and TATONE Ponds: trout

The ponds have been stocked and fishing for rainbow trout has been slow.

MORGAN LAKE: trout, bullheads

Legal and trophy-sized trout have been stocked. Fishing is fair-good for small crappie and 12-inch catfish.

OLIVE LAKE: trout, kokanee

Fishing will remain good here throughout the fall at this high elevation lake. Fish for rainbow in the shallow weedy areas and search for the kokanee in the deep portions of this lake. Anglers have reported several fish with white spot parasites on their skin. If these fish are quickly released they will shed the parasites during the cooler months.

PEACH POND: trout

Fishing is slow.

PENDLAND LAKE: trout

The lake has been stocked with legal-sized rainbow, and fingerling plants from last year should provide good angling. Angling success will improve as water temperatures begin to cool.

ROULET POND: trout

The pond has been stocked three times with legal-sized rainbow trout. Fishing should be slow-fair.

ROWE CREEK RESERVOIR, BULL PRAIRIE RESERVOIR, TROUT FARM POND, LONG CREEK POND, CAVENDER POND: trout

Fishing is poor for rainbow trout. High water temperatures are inhibiting success. Fishing will improve with the return of cooler weather.

TROUT FARM POND: rainbow and brook trout

Fishing will remain good in this spring-fed pond. It is very weedy so a float tube is advised.

UMATILLA RIVER: summer steelhead, coho and trout

The upper Umatilla should be good for catch-and-release fishing for rainbow trout. The Umatilla river opens for steelhead and coho angling Sept. 1, anglers should target the lower river near the Hwy 395 crossing for early season success.

UMATILLA FOREST PONDS: rainbow trout

The Ukiah and Walla Walla Ranger District ponds have been stocked and angling is fair.

WALLA WALLA RIVER: trout

River flows have reached summer flow levels and trout fishing has been good.

WALLOWA LAKE: rainbow trout, kokanee

Wallowa Lake is providing good fishing for stocked rainbow trout. Kokanee fishing is fair as fish are moving deeper in the lake and are difficult to catch.

WILLOW CREEK RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, brown bullhead

Crappie angling has slowed as the fish have moved off shore and are suspended in the water column. Bass fishing has been good. Trout angling has slowed as water temperatures have warmed. Anglers are reminded of the new angling regulation: catch-and-release only for largemouth bass.

NORTHEAST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: ARCHERY DEER and ELK (opens Aug. 29), MOURNING DOVE and FOREST GROUSE (open Sept. 1), COUGAR and BEAR

Wolves in northeast Oregon
Wolves are protected by state law and it is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters in northeastern Oregon need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall.

ODFW needs hunters’ assistance to establish wolves’ presence in Oregon; please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to La Grande office (541) 963-2138 or online.

BAKER COUNTY

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

SQUIRRELS can be found throughout the agricultural valleys. Hunters should ask permission before hunting on private land.

COYOTE numbers are good throughout the district. Remember to ask for permission before hunting on private properties. Try calling in early morning and late afternoon.

GRANT COUNTY

The date of the youth pheasant hunt for the John Day valley is incorrect in the 2009-10 Oregon Game Bird Regulations. The correct date for the hunt is: Sept. 19-20.

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1. Huckleberries are starting to get ripe and may be a good place to find bears.

COYOTES numbers are good in most of the district. They may be found mousing in agricultural areas this time of year but remember to ask permission first before hunting.

MORROW, GILLIAM and WHEELER COUNTIES

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

COYOTE hunting: Watch wind direction to help prevent giving away your location. Calling with game distress calls can be very successful.

UNION COUNTY

COYOTE numbers are strong throughout the county. Using predator calls as a lure and moving call sights after 20 minutes is an effective method for harvesting coyotes. Be sure to ask permission before hunting on private land.

BLACK BEARS are plentiful through out the county. Look for bear sign around fruit trees and in canyon bottoms. Bears can be concentrated along creeks and rivers in the late summer. Hawthorn thickets and cherry orchards are great places to harvest early fall bears. Be sure to ask for permission to hunt around private orchards. Bear skulls must be checked in within ten days of harvest, with the jaws propped open.

COUGARS are common in Union county. Hunt areas with high numbers of deer and elk. Look for recent kill-sites and set up a stand. Cats will often return to feed on the kill.

LADD MARSH WILDLIFE AREA

Bird hunting seasons are now closed.

WALLOWA DISTRICT

COUGAR and BEAR opened Aug. 1.

Good numbers of COYOTES can be found throughout Wallowa County. Calling coyotes with rabbit distress type calls has been effective for hunters. It is important to choose areas with abundant coyote sign and little human activity.

GROUND SQUIRRELS are still very active and are mostly found on or adjacent to agricultural lands. Many landowners welcome hunters to help reduce squirrels in high density areas. Hunters need to secure permission before entering private lands.

NORTHEAST ZONE VIEWING

Baker County

This is a good time to watch for songbirds. Target riparian areas during early morning hours for best viewing opportunities. Recent sightings along the Snake River and Burnt River Canyons include mountain bluebirds, bullock’s oriole, lazuli buntings, yellow-breasted chats, and eastern kingbirds.

Golden eagles can be seen nesting along canyon walls.

Gilliam, Morrow and Wheeler Counties

The thermometer tells us it is summer here in the basin, and the majority of our summer species are tending their young. As their young fledge it is common to find fledglings on the ground or making short flights. During their first few days out of the nest, fledglings are building up their muscles for flight and cannot go very far. Their parents will continue to care for the young as they learn to fly even though they are not in the nest.

Raptor viewing is good along most roadways. Red-tails, Northern Harriers, Kestrels and Barn owls can all be seen near their nests with young near fledging, if not fledged already. Swainson’s hawks, mostly dark phase, can be seen on their nests north of Lexington.

Along the waterways one can see Canada geese, Mallards, Cinnamon teals, Coots, Buffleheads, Redheads, Northern Shovelers, Common Merganser and other waterfowl tending their young. Along the shorelines one can spot Black-necked Stilts, American Avocets, and Spotted sandpipers among others; their young are usually much harder to spot but are usually near by. Irrigated pastures are also a great place to look for shorebirds.

Both Western and Mountain bluebirds can be seen in the forested areas, try the Sun Flower Flats Road for the best viewing.

Hummingbirds are easier to spot in areas where there are fewer flowering plants.

Deer and Elk with their young are becoming easier to spot as summer moves on. Check the meadows of the forest at dawn and dusk for the best opportunity.

Union County

Pronghorn Antelope can be viewed on Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, often along Pierce Road and Hot Lake Lane. Deer and elk can be seen around the edges of the valley. Many young birds are hatching around the valley. Look for game birds such as California Quail and Ring-necked Pheasants along rural roads in the evenings and at dusk. Turkey polts have been reported at several sites around the county. Songbirds are plentiful throughout the Grande Ronde Valley and are most active during the cooler portions of the day.

There are still many elk at the Anthony Creek feed site on the Elkhorn Wildlife Area.

ODFW’s Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, La Grande

The Tule Lake Public Access Area is open for the season. There are also numerous quality viewing opportunities from the roads that pass through the area. Binoculars or a spotting scope will help as many animals are best viewed from a distance.

Numerous duck species can been seen including mallards, pintails, gadwall, American wigeon, wood duck, ring-necked duck, scaup, redheads, ruddy duck and cinnamon and green-winged teal. Many broods Canada geese are now difficult to discern from their parents as they have “colored up” and most are flying. Duck broods are present throughout the area and may be seen as they paddle for the cover of vegetation.

Several nesting pairs of greater sandhill cranes have successfully raised their young to fledging. Cranes may begin gathering in larger groups in meadows to feed and gather strength for the southward migration later this summer.

NOTE: Please report any observations of banded sandhill cranes to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area office (541-963-4954) or to Gary Ivey, Western Crane Conservation Manager, International Crane Foundation (541-383-2033). Please note the positions of the colors on each leg (right leg means the crane’s right leg, no matter which way the bird is facing) along with the date, time and location of the observation.

Numerous birds of prey can be seen utilizing the wildlife area. Red-tailed hawks, great horned owls, Swainson’s hawks and Northern harriers are present and may be seen hunting or perching throughout the area.

Water levels have begun to fall in many portions of the wildlife area. The resulting mudflats are attractive to shorebirds and many have been observed lately. Recent observations of shorebirds have included single individuals of both marbled and Hudsonian godwits; both very unusual for Ladd Marsh.

Visitors are reminded not to approach nesting birds too closely to minimize disturbance during this critical season.

A few elk have been observed scattered across the wildlife area from Glass Hill to the Tule Lake Public Access Area. Both mule and white-tailed deer are also using the slopes above Foothill Road. Foxes, coyotes and badgers may all be seen in fields and meadows as the task of raising young increases pressure to hunt.

Dogs are not permitted within the Wildlife Area, on or off leash. For more information on access rules for the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, please consult the 2008-2009 Oregon Game Bird Regulations or call the wildlife area (541) 963-4954.

Umatilla County

Soon large flights of Swainson’s hawks will begin forming in agricultural areas near the Columbia River in preparation for flights south. They will be seen flying in the Hermiston, Stanfield, Echo area in the earlier half of the morning as September approaches. Neotropical migrant passerine birds will also be common along riparian zones from the lowlands near the Columbia River up to the high elevation areas of the Umatilla National Forest as they begin to slowly start moving south as the fall approaches.

Flocks of ducks and geese can be seen along the Columbia River and large reservoirs in the County. Elk will still be common along the upper open areas of the west slope of the Blue Mountains. Deer will be seen in herds from the valley floor to the upper Blue Mountains. The riverine and agricultural areas near the base of the mountains will be dominated by white-tailed deer. The desert and mountain areas will be inhabited primarily by mule deer. Elk can be viewed throughout the day while deer will be most visible in the first and last two hours of the day.

Gulls and raptors can be seen along the Columbia River. Visit local wildlife areas to see shore and marsh birds in addition to perching birds and raptors. Wood ducks, mallards and mergansers can be seen traveling in flocks up and down the river systems that have cottonwood trees along the banks.

Wallowa County

Raptors

Red-tailed and Ferruginous hawks, as well as a variety of owls can be observed through out Wallowa Valley and Zumwalt prairie. Most raptors can be easily observed from county roads. A good pair of binoculars will improve viewing opportunities.

Bald eagles

Most wintering bald eagles have left the Wallowa valley to return to summering areas; however, interested birders can still observe a pair of eagles at the head of Wallowa Lake where the Wallowa River empties into the lake. A large nest can be observed in an old cottonwood tree and the eagles will continue to utilize the nest area.

Mule and White-tailed Deer

Mule and white-tailed deer are common in agricultural areas adjacent to Highway 82. Animals can be observed during early morning and late evening hours.

Bighorn Sheep

Bighorn sheep can often be observed along the canyon walls of the Grande Ronde River when driving both up and down stream from the town of Troy.

Mountain Goats

Mountain goats can be observed from Hat Point lookout. A short walk to the Snake River canyon rim from the lookout and the use of binoculars will improve a person’s chance of spotting goats in the rough rocky cliffs. Hikers and backpackers can observe mountain goats many places in the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Ridge tops and peaks along Hurricane Divide between Hurricane Creek and the Lostine River are good places to spot mountain goats.

Fire season is here
Expect increased fire safety restrictions and possible fire-related closures. Check with the land manager where you are going before you head out.
Oregon National Forests
Oregon BLM
Oregon Department of Forestry

FISHING

BROWNLEE RESERVOIR: crappie, bass, catfish, bluegill, trout, perch

Crappie fishing has picked up again but the fish are 20 feet deep and have have a very soft bite. Red and white jigs are working well. Catfish angling is very good with some large fish being taken. Bass angling has picked up and some legal sized bass are being caught. The water level is 17 feet below full. Call Idaho Power Company’s recording at 1-800-422-3143 to get information on access at recreational sites or visit their Web site under the “Rivers and Recreation” heading.

Reservoir level information

OXBOW RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, bass, catfish

No recent report.

HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, bass, catfish

Crappie fishing has slowed from a few weeks ago, but may pick up after the spawn. Bass fishing has been slow. Fishing for 12 inch catfish has been good with some large fish being caught as well. Trolling for trout is fair-good.

SNAKE RIVER below HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR: trout, smallmouth bass

No recent report. Bass fishing should be good.

Get updated information on flow levels.

SNAKE RIVER (Above Brownlee Reservoir): channel catfish, flathead catfish, smallmouth bass
Flows at the Nyssa gauge ranged from approximately 7,600 to 9,600 cfs Aug. 19 through Aug. 24. Flows at the Weiser gauge ranged from approximately 9,100 to 11,400 cfs Aug. 19 through Aug. 24. Flows at both gauges are slightly below flows observed last year. Angling for smallmouth bass remains slow while angling for catfish is improving.

Weekend Fishing Opportunities

* The B run steelhead population destined for the Clearwater River is currently migrating through the lower Columbia River.
* Chinook fishing is improving in the lower Columbia above Tongue Point.
* Walleye fishing is good near Troutdale and in the Gorge.
* As temperatures continue to fall, walleye and smallmouth bass fishing will continue to heat up in the John Day Pool.

Columbia River Fish Counts:
Regulations:

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD:

In the lower Columbia this past weekend salmonid boat anglers had the best catch rates in the Portland to Longview area where anglers averaged 0.79 fall chinook, 0.14 steelhead, and 0.05 coho caught per boat. Bank anglers had the best success in the gorge where anglers averaged 0.19 steelhead, and 0.01 fall chinook caught per angler. At Buoy 10 this past weekend anglers averaged 0.39 fall chinook and 2.9 coho caught per boat.

Gorge Bank:
Weekend checking showed one fall chinook and 15 adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus four unclipped steelhead released for 100 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats:
Weekend checking showed one adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept and one unclipped steelhead released for four boats (13 anglers).

Troutdale Boats:
Weekend checking showed two fall chinook adults, one fall chinook jack, and two adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus one fall chinook released for 86 boats (186 anglers).

Portland to Rainier Bank:
Weekend checking showed no catch for nine bank anglers.

Portland to Clatskanie Boats:
Weekend checking showed 158 fall chinook adults, nine fall chinook jacks, nine adipose fin-clipped coho, and 22 adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus 10 fall chinook adults, one unclipped coho, and seven unclipped steelhead released for 212 boats (531 anglers).

Estuary Bank:
No report.

Estuary Boats:
Weekend checking showed 84 fall chinook adults, 769 adipose fin-clipped coho, and two adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus 86 fall chinook adults, 511 unclipped coho, and four unclipped steelhead released for 437 boats (1,343 anglers).

STURGEON:

The Columbia River Compact met on Thursday December 18 and adopted new sturgeon regulations for 2009. For the news release, please check the link below:

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2008/december/121808.asp

Sturgeon anglers are reminded that effective Jan. 1, 2009, a new method of measuring sturgeon for retention will take effect statewide. Under the new rules, sturgeon will be measured from the tip of the nose to the fork in the tail (rather than the tip of the tail). The resulting allowed retention measurements are slightly shorter than the old method. As a result, the 2009 slot measurement for sturgeon caught in the Columbia River downstream of The Dalles Dam to the Wauna Power lines, including tributaries, will be 38 to 54 inches FORK LENGTH. Upstream of The Dalles Dam to the Oregon/Washington border, the fork length for sturgeon retention will be 43 to 54 inches beginning on Jan. 1. Below the Wauna Power lines, beginning May 9 through the close of the 2009 retention season, the fork length for sturgeon retention is 41 – 54 inches. Remember, all of these figures are simple conversions of the old method of measuring sturgeon. It does not mean you can keep smaller fish, only that the method of measuring “keepers” has changed. So, from Jan. 1 on, make sure that your sturgeon is of legal length under this NEW measurement technique.

Effective Saturday, August 1 through Wednesday, September 30 the lower Columbia River from Bonneville Dam downstream to Wauna Powerlines will be closed to the retention of sturgeon. Catch and release will be allowed during the retention closure.
Gorge Bank:
Closed to retention. Weekend checking showed three sublegal sturgeon released for 17 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats:
Closed to retention. Weekend checking showed seven oversize and 12 sublegal sturgeon released for four boats (nine anglers).

Troutdale Boats:
Closed to retention. Weekend checking showed one legal and 50 sublegal sturgeon released for five boats (12 anglers).

Portland to Longview Bank:
Closed to retention. Weekend checking showed 32 sublegal sturgeon released for seven bank anglers.

Portland to Longview Boats:
Closed to retention. Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Boat & Bank:
Closed to retention. No report.
Bonneville Pool Boat and Bank:
Effective 12:01 AM Saturday June 6, the retention of sturgeon in the Bonneville Pool and tributaries is prohibited because the harvest guideline of 700 legal white sturgeon has been reached. Catch and released angling is allowed through the remainder of the year.

The Dalles Pool Boat and Bank:
Effective 12:01 AM Sunday April 19, the retention of sturgeon in The Dalles Pool and tributaries is prohibited because the harvest guideline of 300 legal white sturgeon has been reached. Catch and release angling is allowed through the remainder of the year.

John Day Boat and Bank:
Effective 12:01 AM Monday April 13, the retention of sturgeon in the John Day Pool and tributaries is prohibited because the harvest guideline of 165 legal white sturgeon has been met. Catch and release angling is allowed through the remainder of the year.

WALLEYE:

Gorge Boats:
Weekend checking showed one walleye kept for one boat (five anglers).

Troutdale Boats:
Weekend checking showed 10 walleye kept and one walleye released for 13 boats (27 anglers).

Portland to Longview Boats:
No report.

Bonneville Pool Boats:
No report.

The Dalles Pool Boats:
No report.

John Day Pool Boats:
No report.

MARINE ZONE

FISHING

Tuna fishing was the hot ticket last week and will be this week if ocean conditions allow. Anglers fishing out of most coastal ports scored an average of four tuna. Projections show this year is shaping up to be the second best on record, well above last year but still well behind 2007’s record year.

Coho fishing along most of the coast took a huge drop this week as most of the fish form up off the Columbia River. As one might expect, the fishing off Astoria was much better; anglers caught an average of 1.4 fish.

For season details about sport ocean salmon fishing visit http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/salmon/Regulations/OceanSport2009.asp.

Halibut fishing is closed off the central Oregon coast will not reopen this year.

The Columbia River sub area, from Cape Falcon (30 miles south of the Columbia River) to Leadbetter Point, Wash. (north of the mouth of the Columbia River), remains open Fridays through Sundays. Fishing will continue every Friday through Sunday until the quota is taken or Sept. 27, which ever occurs first.

For more information on the halibut season, go to http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/finfish/halibut/index.asp.

Fishers landed an average of between two and three rockfish coast wide. Lingcod were harder to come by with fewer than two in 10 anglers finding success.

The marine bag limit has been increased from six marine fish to seven effective May 1. This is the highest marine bag limit since summer of 2005. The marine fish bag includes rockfish and other species such as greenling and cabezon. The increased bag limit is based on a favorable stock assessment for black rockfish, the dominant species in the nearshore groundfish fishery.

Bottomfish anglers need to stay shoreward of the 40-fathom line through Sept. 30 to protect yelloweye rockfish. This regulation applies to lingcod, rockfish, cabezon, flatfish and other species listed on page 100 of the 2009 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations. The 40-fathom line is defined by latitude and longitude; coordinates are online at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp.

Remember: yelloweye rockfish and canary rockfish may not be retained. The Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area approximately 15 miles west of Newport is closed to the harvest of rockfish, lingcod, flatfish and others.

SHELLFISH

Recreational harvesting of mussels is closed along the entire Oregon coast due to elevated levels of PSP toxins. Only mussels are part of the closure. The entire Oregon coast is open to the recreational harvest of clams and other shellfish. However, harvesters should check for current closures on the ODA shellfish safety page or call the shellfish hotline, 1-800-448-2474. Waters can be closed on short notice because of contaminated waters due to coastal flooding and because of elevated levels of naturally occurring toxins.

The annual razor clam conservation closure on the Clatsop County beaches north of Tillamook Head starts July 15 and continues through Sept. 30. Other beaches in the state remain open for razor clamming.

Check out the recreational clam pages on the ODFW Web site: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/ then click on the shellfish icon. The pages contain everything you need to know for identifying and harvesting Oregon’s clams.

CRABS

The coast averaged between three and four crab per crabber, except out of Winchester Bay and Charleston where crabbers harvested between six and seven crab a piece. Many male crabs have recently molted so return soft-shelled crabs to the ocean so they can fill out. Crab that have recently molted are not filled out with meat and are considered of lower quality.

Crabbing success is often best during the slack tide at high tide or low tide when crabs are looking for food. Recreational Bay Crab Survey data on catch statistics are updated every month during the winter on the ODFW Web site at the recently-launched Crabbing Reports page. This provides prospective crabbers some information on the recent success of other crabbers in the three bays that are sampled during the winter: Yaquina Bay, Alsea Bay and Coos Bay.

Sport crabbing is also open in the ocean until Oct. 16.

Some sport crabbers have difficulty correctly measuring the minimum size for Dungeness crab, which is 5 3?4 inches measured in a straight line across the back immediately in front of, but not including, the points. For a photograph and diagram see page 96 of the 2009 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations booklet.

MARINE ZONE VIEWING

EVENT

Oregon Shorebird Festival, Aug. 28-30

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Cape Arago Audubon Society, Oregon Field Ornithologists and many other sponsors have a full weekend of activities planned for birders of all skill levels. The festival is headquartered at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston. Activities include expertly guided land-based field trips to Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, New River and the Coos Bay area. Evening programs on birds will feature Geoff Keller “My Most Memorable Field Recording Experiences” and Jim Danzenbaker “A Workshop on the Nuances of Shorebird Identification.”

Bring your best pair of binoculars. Bandon Marsh and Coos Bay are renowned for shorebird watching and each year a few rare bird sighting have delighted festival attendees. Regular migrants include Black-bellied plover, Semi-palmated plover, Pacific golden-plover, Western sandpiper, Least sandpiper, Dunlin, Whimbrel, Long-billed dowitcher, and Red-necked phalarope. To register for the festival or for more information go to www.fws.gov/oregoncoast/shorebirdfestival.htm or contact Dawn Grafe at (541) 867-4550.

Viewing

Green and leatherback sea turtles visit Oregon during the summer when ocean currents bring warmer waters to the coast. They are usually seen offshore foraging for jellyfish, but occasionally they come ashore. If a turtle is caught in a cold thermal uprising it may get cold and come on to the beach to warm up and rest. While this is rare, beach walkers do come across a turtle crawl where the turtle’s flippers make a distinctive pattern in the sand. If you see a turtle on the beach or out at sea do not disturb it and report the sighting to the Sea Turtles Forever Turtle Watch Hotline at (503) 739-1446 or email at info@seaturtlesforever.com. Marc Ward, director of Sea Turtles Forever, a sea turtle conservation program based in Seaside.

Nevada Man Arrested in Stolen Semi

William Edward Craig, Photograph Source: Jefferson County Sheriff's Office
William Edward Craig, Photograph Source: Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

A Nevada man was arrested Monday afternoon by an Oregon State Police (OSP) trooper in a stolen commercial truck on Highway 97 north of Madras. The arrest was made with the cooperation of a trucking company through the use of their GPS system to track the stolen truck’s movements.

Senior Trooper Justin Hyser was notified at approximately 4:30 p.m. of a possible stolen commercial truck traveling southbound on Highway 97 near Kent. Senior Trooper Hyser called the victim company, Knight Refrigeration, and learned the truck’s driver, William Craig, 51, from Zephyr Cove, Nevada, allegedly took the truck from the Portland area and refused to return it after being contacted by the company.

At approximately 5:00 p.m., Senior Trooper Hyser spotted the stolen commercial truck and semi-trailer just north of Madras near milepost 92. The vehicles were stopped without incident and CRAIG was arrested for Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle and two counts of Possession of a Stolen Vehicle. He was lodged at the Jefferson County Jail.

Authorities Raid $50,000,000 Marijuana Garden

Authorities seized and destroyed more than 14,500 marijuana plants with an estimated wholesale street value of about $50 million on private land north of Prineville
Authorities seized and destroyed more than 14,500 marijuana plants with an estimated wholesale street value of about $50 million on private land north of Prineville.
Law enforcement officers seized and destroyed more than 14,500 marijuana plants with an estimated street value of over $50 million on private land north of Prineville last week.

State, and federal law enforcement officers were in the Prineville area to eradicate a marijuana growing operation at the above listed location. During this operation, law enforcement destroyed over 14,500 marijuana plants in the outdoor garden. Detectives also seized three firearms that had been left behind by the garden tenders.

At the current street wholesale value per pound, and if at maturity each plant produced one pound of marijuana, the street wholesale value of this operation would have grossed approximately $50,000,000 dollars.

Early in August CODE received information from a hunter, scouting in the area, that they had discovered an active marijuana garden. CODE began an investigation at that time.

Due to archery season starting soon, and this being a popular hunting area, it was urgent that the garden be eradicated as soon as possible to protect the public from the possible dangers of an armed encounter with the garden tenders.

A multi-agency force was assembled on the evening of August 18th, and during the early hours of the next morning a tactical team made entry into the garden area and secured the location. No persons were encountered in the garden at the time of entry. Once the garden was secure, an eradication team moved in to process the area for evidence and removal of the plants. The plants were later airlifted to a safe location and destroyed.

The following agencies were directly, or indirectly, involved in this operation: CODE, CERT, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Crook County Sheriff’s Office and Search and Rescue, Bend Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, US Forest Service, BLM, and Oregon State Police.

The private landowner had no knowledge the marijuana grow was on his property due to the remote location. The landowner was in complete cooperation with law enforcement throughout this investigation.

The garden tenders had caused a substantial amount of environmental damage in the area of the grow site. There was a substantial amount of trash strewn around the area, damage to a spring which had been converted to use as a water source for the plants, as well as fertilizers and pesticides left in the area.

Over the past three years CODE has seen a constant increase in the number of outdoor marijuana gardens on public lands, or near public lands, in Central Oregon, Gautney said. In 2008 CODE had a higher plant seizure than in 2007. Already in 2009 there have had more plant seizures than all of 2008.

If you have information about illegal drug activity, including marijuana grows, you may contact CODE at 312-6414 during business hours, or call your local law enforcement agency.

“How to Develop a Business Plan” Workshop in Bend

BEND – Central Oregon Community College’s Business Development Center is holding a two-evening “How to Develop a Business Plan” workshop in Bend at the COCC Campus on Tuesdays, September 22 & 29, from 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. First-time business owners will learn how to evaluate their finances, target their market, and present their ideas in a written business plan.

Cost is $49.00 and includes workbook. Pre-registration required. Call 383-7290 to register or go to www.cocc.edu.

Oregon Paleo Lands Institute Field Center

FOSSIL – The Oregon Paleo Lands Institute, which opens the window to 400 million years through the geology and natural history of central Oregon with its programs and exhibits, will dedicate its new Field Center with public ceremonies on Saturday, Sept. 12. Events start with music at noon, a dedication ceremony at 1 p.m., and special activities through the afternoon.

A key attraction will be a 12-foot long metal sculpture of a historic creature called the Plesiosaur (Plee-zee-uh-SAWR-uhs). This voracious marine reptile prowled the ancient seas of Eastern Oregon, 80-90 million years ago, during the Age of Dinosaurs. Students from Mitchell studied their historic neighbor, working with visiting artist Larry Williams to craft the sculpture. The Plesiosaur is a dramatic reminder that Eastern Oregon was a vastly different and fascinating place millions of years ago.

The Oregon Paleo Lands Institute, founded in 2003, is devoted to helping people understand the ancient and living landscapes of the John Day Basin. The region is rich in fossil history, and is home to the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. The non-profit institute provides educational resources to students and teachers, conducts tours for visiting professionals, offers scheduled programs and hikes, and also custom-designs day trips for visitors interested in exploring the fossil record.

OPLI also is working closely with counties and communities in the John Day Basin to develop more tourism. This economic development aspect of the Institute’s mission promotes the John Day Basin as one of the most unique places on the globe to peer back millions of years.

The new Field Center is now the 1,400-square-foot headquarters for the Institute. Besides housing staff offices, the Field Center includes interactive displays about Oregon’s fascinating geologic history, exhibits, and a unique gift store. The Field Center is open Tuesday through Friday 9am – 4:30 pm and Saturday 9am – 3pm. More limited Fall hours begin mid-October.

The Institute which is a 503(c )(3) non-profit organization, is supported through private donations, membership gifts, corporate, government and foundation grant funds. Initial funding for the Field Center at Fossil comes from a generous Small Business Administration grant of $250,000 with additional significant support from Wheeler County and OPLI supporters.

What: The Public is invited to a Dedication of new field center for Oregon Paleo Lands Institute
Special Feature: Exhibit Opening – Plesiosaur Project “Tiger of the Cretaceous Seas”
When: Saturday, Sept. 12, from noon to 4 p.m.
Where: Field Center, 333 Fourth St., Fossil, OR
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Bend Teen Rescued After 150 Foot Fall

An eighteen-year-old hiker fell 150 feet while climbing at Mt. Bachelor with friends and was later rescued by local search and rescue groups.

Will Johnston of Bend was rescued the Mt. Bachelor Ski Patrol, a Forest Service officer, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, and the Sunriver Fire Department. Johnston was transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend.

Deschutes County 911 Dispatch received a call for help late afternoon on Thursday. Mt. Bachelor employees were in the area working on projects and were able to reach and stabilize Johnston. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Mountain Rescue Unit and support personnel responded to the scene.

With the assistance of Mt. Bachelor personnel search and rescue teams were transported to the summit of the mountain on the Summit Express chair lift. From there the teams were able to reach Johnston who was treated at the scene by search and rescue medics. Johnston was transported to safety with the assistance of a rope system. Sunriver Fire Ambulance took Johnston from the Mt. Bachelor Sunrise Lodge to Stl Charles Medical Center, Bend for minor injuries.

Stranded Kayaker Rescued After Deschutes River Mishap

Deschutes County Sheriff Deputies and Bend Fire Medics responded Thursday afternoon to the Dillon Falls boat ramp for a man stranded on the east side of the Deschutes River.

Initial reports indicated the subject, Sterling Crosson, capsized his Kayak while navigating the Deschutes River in this area and just above a set of white water rapids.

Emergency personnel on scene learned that Crosson had capsized his Kayak, while paddling above a set of white water rapids located below the Dillon Falls boat ramp. Crosson was able to cling on to his Kayak and safely reach the opposite shore, where he clung to rocks and debris along the shoreline. Crosson eventually freed himself from the water, avoiding the potential for being swept down the extreme set of rapids, where he had capsized his Kayak.

Sheriff’s deputies and Bend Fire Medics were able to direct Crosson to walk up a ridge, where Bend Fire Medics eventually met him and walked him out. Bend Fire Medics were able to reach Crosson by crossing the Deschutes River in a raft at the Dillon Falls boat ramp. Crosson was safely brought back across river and re-united with family. Crosson was found to be in good health by medics who evaluated him on scene.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office advises those who recreate on the Deschutes River to be aware of the area where they plan to swim or boat. To make sure they use the proper personal safety devices, they navigate rapids they are familiar with or know based on their skill level they can safely travel through. The Sheriff’s Office also stresses to those recreating in the Deschutes to be vigilant for sudden changes in the water and for water hazards.

Local Band and Pub Provides Support for Kids

Local Pop Folk Rock band, KouseFly teams up with Southside Pub and Breedlove guitars to raise money for local non profit Healthy Beginnings.

For the past 10 years Southside pub owner, Greg Farfaglia, has held an all-you-can-eat pig roast in the parking lot next to the pub’s building. This year he is doing something different and helping give back to the community by purchasing a Breedlove Atlas Studio Series C25/SM guitar at cost for KouseFly from the Breedlove Guitar Company for a raffle with 100% of its proceeds going to the non profit.

KouseFly pitched the idea to the pub owner after a similar successful event that was hosted at Redmond, Oregon’s Cross Creek Cafe where they helped raised money for Caden Thrasher, a toddler suffering brain cancer. The guitar raised $1,000 of over $2,500 raised.

Healthy Beginnings was the ideal candidate to benefit from for this raffle, withits continued support of providing health screenings for children all over Central Oregon.

“We are very excited to give this beautiful guitar away to a home and continue to help the community while we perform our music,” says the band’sfrontman Brian Hinderberger, “It’s an electric environment when we announce the winner and everyone feels good because the money is going to a great cause.”

Raffle tickets cost $5 and can be purchased at Southside Pub

What: 10th Annual SOUTHSIDE Pig Roast

Where: 61160 S Highway 97 # B Bend, OR 97702 (541) 383-7672

When: Sat. August 22nd, 5PM – 10PM

Music: Kousefly 5PM – 6:45PM

Moon Mountain Ramblers 7PM – 10PM

Local Pop Folk Rock band, KouseFly
Local Pop Folk Rock band, KouseFly

www.kousefly.com

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